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View Full Version : Waayy off Topic, Stacker/Destacker Q



BubbleLamp
10-17-2002, 12:26 PM
Well I've got a second DSR6K coming, and want to put it upstairs. Unfortunately my sat. feed comes in downstairs. This is what I'm thinking of doing, let me know if I'm off my rocker.

Run the dual-LNB feeds to a powered 2x4 multiswitch.

Put a stacker on two of the outputs. Hook the stacker output to my existing in-wall cable TV wiring (RG6).

Disconnect the two cables where they come together at the front out the house and connect them directly to one another, bypassing the splitter.

Put the destacker on the cable upstairs and connect to new DSR.

Total cable length from multiswitch thru the house wiring to the new TiVo will be <100 feet.

Assuming that will all work, I'd like recommendations on a reasonably priced multiswitch (Spauns are too much $$) and stacker/destacker.

Thanks

newbie
10-17-2002, 01:34 PM
I've had good luck with
http://www.stores.ebay.com/id=5278851
for multiswitch. It might be cheaper to run more coax.
Never ordered but
http://www.9thtee.com/dssstuff.htm
hast stackers/destackers

FredThompson
10-17-2002, 01:36 PM
What do you mean, "stacker"? Are you talking about re-modulating one of the feeds to a different freq range and combining then splitting and demodulating at the distribution end upstairs?

Maybe you should check with these guys:

Worthington Distribution
http://www.worthdist.com

Some of the stuff is pricey, some is really good. They had the best deal on coax ground loop isolators at $7 (or something like that) when everybody else wanted $15 for the same item. So many of the people in this market charge too much. These guys are pretty good.

Orbit
http://www.orbitsat.com

Radio Shack has the cheapest universal transformers.

You might want to poke around this forum:

http://www.diyaudio.com

There's some good background info on coax sharing at:

http://www.avcast.com

Make sure your coax can handle the bandwidth with extra room. If you use a cable modem, don' t forget about that. Mine is at channel 66 (I think, they checked that level last week.) Don't know if that's standard, I assume it is.

And I'll sneak this link in:

Free Norton Systemworks 2003 Pro (U.S. only, sorry Canada)

https://www-secure.symantec.com/specprog/freesysworks/

:eek:

richlee91
10-17-2002, 02:50 PM
You may not need the stacker...this sounds like my installation

I have a pair of cables running throughout the house and I wanted dual setups in each location I use two switches:

So it goes

dish to multiswitch - (Two goto receiver in basement and two go into wall) then on the mid level take the two that came from the multiswitch and add another multi switch. Two go into the receiver on the middle level the other two go into the wall which runs upstairs.

Most of the houses in my area are built for cable so they have a pair of rg 6 (actually I think it's rg 59 but it works :) run throughout the house. (Not a star pattern like Twisted Pair ethernet more like the old coax days of networking)

Also smarthome.com has pretty cheap 4x2 switches (for like 39 bucks) (http://www.smarthome.com/7792.html)

captain_video
10-17-2002, 02:55 PM
A stacker modulates one of the sat LNB outputs so that you can piggyback both feeds onto a single RG-6 cable. A destacker (?) is required at the other end to split the signals apart. It works very much like a diplexer buyt at higher frequencies. They can also be very expensive.

Spaun multiswitches run all price ranges. If your total cable run is less than 100 feet then you probably doon't need a powered multiswitch. I picked up a 2X8 passive Spaun multiswitch on one of the eBay stores for about $60. The powered version runs about $250.

The link to 9thTee DSS Stuff provides a good illustration of what you'll need for your setup. Based on your description it sounds like a viable method for adding your 2nd DTivo. Personally, I would have run more coax. I wired up every room in my house for cable, satellite feeds, and phone lines.

And now for the "This Old Satellite Setup" portion of our program.

If you can run your sat feed from the basement up to the attic it's pretty simple to drop a coax line through the 2X4 header at the top of the wall in the attic. Look around and see if the builder provided some sort of access to a wiring run through the basement ceiling to the upper floors. Otherwise you might consider running the coax on the outside of the house and bringing it into the attic through the outside wall. Make sure you seal any openings you create to prevent moisture and insects from getting in.

Get yourself an electronic stud finder (about $15 at Home Depot the last time I checked) to locate the wall studs in the room where you want to install the sat feed. Pick out a spot on the wall where you plan on setting up the receiver and find the closest stud with the stud finder. Try to avoid using an outside wall because the space between the drywall and the outside sheathing is full of insulation and would be a royal pain to attempt a cable drop. Besides, the top of the wall would probably be under the eaves of the sloped roof and you'd have to be a dwarf to get to it.

Measure along the wall to the spot where the new outlet box will be located. Use an inside wall that intersects with the wall you are installing the box in. Measure up from the floor the same height as the other outlets in the room for aesthetic reasons. Place an outlet box on the wall and trace the outline of the box onto the drywall. You will need to decide whether or not you want to install a single or dual-gang box in the wall. Make sure the box is level when you do it. I would recommend a dual-gang box if you think you might also want to install another coax line for cable TV or possibly a phone line later on. Carefully cut an opening in the wall using a drywall saw. BE CAREFULL NOT TO CUT INTO ANY ELECTRICAL WIRES. Poke the saw through first and wiggle it up and down gently to feel if any wires are present behind the wall. Finish cutting the box outline and remove the drywall rectangle.

Go into the attic and find the top of the reference wall that you measured from. Locate the spot along the wall header where the stud is located. You will see the nails driven through the top plate into the stud as a reference point. Make sure you are on the same side of the wall stud as the hole you just cut in the drywall. Drill a hole in the top of the 2X4 header (it may be a double thickness plate so use a long bit) at least 3/8" in diameter. Avoid drilling too close to any nail heads or you'll screw up the drill bit. If you're going to run more than one cable into a room you may want to make the hole slightly larger.

Run your RG-6 coax from the basement up into the attic by whatever method you choose. If you plan on installing sat feeds to multiple rooms on the 2nd floor then you may want to consider placing the multi-switch in the attic. If your basement is unfinished and you want to also run sat feeds to the first floor then you can simply drill up through the floor and run the wires from underneath using the same method I'm outlining here. If your basement is finished with drywall ceilings then it gets a lot trickier but I'll leave that for another session.

Once you've decided where you want your multi-switch located, run suitable lengths of coax from the multi-switch so that it can be routed neatly with no kinks through the attic, through the hole in the wall header you drilled, and down through the opening in the wall. Allow yourself a couple of extra feet to play with and trim the excess later. Run the coax through the hole in the header and down through the wall. You should be able to reach into the hole in the drywall and retrieve the end of the cable quite easily.

captain_video
10-17-2002, 02:56 PM
"This Old Satellite Setup, Part 2"

You can get outlet boxes at any Home Depot or hardware store that have tabs on them that swing out when the screws are tightened. Pry open one or more of the cable ports on the outlet box and feed the coax through the opening (some have small tabs that need to be broken off to open them up). Repeat for each cable that will be accessed via this outlet. Insert the box so the top and bottom flanges are flush against the drywall and tighten the screws until the tabs are snug against the inside of the wallboard. Don't overtighten them or you'll crush the drywall and then you'll have a real patch job to deal with.

Get an outlet cover with F-81 coax barrel connectors or use a wallplate that accepts keystone connectors (9th Tee sells these; check out their networking stuff and you'll find F-insert coax keystone jacks; keystone jack coverplates are generally limited to a single width box so make sure you get the right sized box). Cut the coax, leaving a short service loop to work with and install F-56 coax connectors on the end(s). Connect the coax to the wallplate and secure the wallplate. Complete all your connections to the satellite and multi-switch and you should be good to go.

BubbleLamp
10-17-2002, 03:25 PM
Wow, I fee I should pay you for that Cap'n! Actually, I'm not planning to do any added cable runs, it's just not worth it to me. (Don't plan to be in this house too many more years.)

I don't have a pair of cables in the wall, that would make things easier, hence the stacker/destacker route.

I'd be bypassing the incoming cable modem line, that'd just stay straight wired to my room.

PS Fred, I get about 20 spam messages a day about SW 2003, never thought I'd get hit with it here. :eek:

FredThompson
10-17-2002, 07:07 PM
PS Fred, I get about 20 spam messages a day about SW 2003, never thought I'd get hit with it here. :eek:
You may get spam from resellers who want to SELL you a copy of the STANDARD version.

Look at the URL, it's Symantec giving out free copies of the PRO version, no strings attached. Big difference.

This just started and Symantec rarely sends advertising email.

BubbleLamp
10-18-2002, 11:00 PM
Originally posted by FredThompson
There's some good background info on coax sharing at:

http://www.avcast.com

Heh Fred, you ever use one of these? They seem pretty inexpensive.


Also, anyone know why these (http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1384846006) Spaun boxes are so cheap?

FredThompson
10-18-2002, 11:20 PM
No, I'd never heard of AVCast until a few days ago. I think it was in one of the threads here but I also hang out on doom9, everwicked, and a few other A/V places so can't tell you for sure.

The IR aspect looks very interesting. I've collected lots of stuff on boosting IR and universal controllers and the like. Starting to make me wonder what could be done.

If you want those things, let me know. They're all mirrored here but I can probably cobble together another link list. The best PC IR stuff seems to be girder. I've been toying with the idea of putting that and an IR transmitter on the BookPC that is by my DTivo so it could control everything in the A/V cabinet. Would be cool if it could work with the TiVo doing overlay (a la the caller id and im apps.) Everything could be hidden except a little IR receiver.

captain_video
10-19-2002, 08:34 AM
BL,

The passive spaun multi-switches are all fairly inexpensice. It's when you get into their active models that they go through the roof. I bought a 2X8 passive Spaun and it wa only about $60.00. The active models seem to be a bit larger and are probably much more complex than the passive designs. I think most powered models just use some sort of in-line booster that compensates for the loss in the switch. The Spauns must be using some sort of electronic switch matrix instead of just splitters and A/B switches. I'd love to crack the case on one of these puppies and take a gander inside to see what makes them tick. I was amazed to see what makes up a passive multi-switch when I opened one of them up. It literally was a bunch of splitters and powered A/B switches crammed in a box with short coax cables connecting them all together.

KRavEN
10-19-2002, 10:06 AM
I need to do the stacker trick for my downstairs DTivo. I only have one cable in the wall and because of where the outlet is, the only way to get another one down would be to tear up a bunch of sheetrock.

My main issue is that I allready have a spaun 5x8 multiswitch and a 3 LNB oval dish. The 9th tee site says only works with one dual LNB, so I'm guessing that means it can't take 2 inputs from a multiswitch. If that's the case, the only way I could do it would be to stack the dual LNB on the 101 sat before it gets to the multi-switch, split the output into 2 and then de-stack one to the multiswitch and the other to the DTivo downstairs.

It would almost be worth it just in cost savings to put up another dish on the 101 sat so I would only have to de-stack once and not have to split the stacked signal into 2.

Anyone have any more insight on this or how I could possibly do it cheaper, let me know.

BubbleLamp
10-26-2002, 07:13 PM
Just a quick update for those that give a hoot. I got my Spaun passive 2X4 switch today. Hooked it to my sat, then took one output and connected it to my existing in-wall cable wiring (RG6). Went to the demarc and tied the cable from the living room to the cable to my upstairs bedroom, bypassing the filters and splitter. Ran upstairs and connected a Sony SAT-B3 using RG-59 (all I had) and got signal strength nearly identical to downstairs. Woohoo!! No stackers yet, too much $$, but at least now I can have one tuner's worth of DTiVo upstairs.

genepool
11-13-2002, 07:34 PM
Would the cheaper multiswitches ($39) at http://www.stores.ebay.com/id=5278851 do well for a short run of about 50 ft? Whats the difference if any between the different manufacturers?

BubbleLamp
11-13-2002, 08:13 PM
Originally posted by genepool
Would the cheaper multiswitches ($39) at http://www.stores.ebay.com/id=5278851 do well for a short run of about 50 ft? Whats the difference if any between the different manufacturers?

I got my Spaun from that dealer. I was worried a passive switch wouldn't work for me, but it's fine. There are a lot of really cheap multiswitches out there, and I'd be leery of some of them. Spaun has a great rep., so I felt confident buying it.

genepool
11-13-2002, 11:42 PM
Thanks. I'm going to try the $39 multiswitch since i only have a short distance to go.

zabs
11-14-2002, 11:16 AM
I just got setup with a 2 room setup from American Satellite and my package included the "Eagle Aspen 4 Way Multi-Switch." I have successfully connected the dual tuner tivo and one other receiver (using 3 of the 4 available outputs) and I have not had to use the optional power connector that is on the multiswitch.

My longest run is only about 50 feet and the documentation that came with the multiswitch said that power was only needed for runs over 100 feet.

My only problem now is that I am tempted to buy another tivo and use that multiswitch to its full capacity. :)

TheDude83
01-02-2003, 10:46 PM
How do these multiswitches effect video extraction? I mean does quality suffer at all with these devices?

I recently bought another Dtivo and an RCA multiswitch (which looks brand new but kind of an old model, it was the last one they had and they said they aren't stocking the item anymore). The multiswitch has been working fine I guess but every so often it sounds like something is clicking inside the multiswitch when I'm changing channels. It's not a real loud noise but it's noticeable. Is this normal?

I also bought a turbonet card for my other Dtivo at the same time. I've had a lot of fun with it but also a lot of problems with the GOP error while importing the files into SpruceUp or DVDMaestro. I assume this happens from time to time but it seems like every other DVD I try to make comes up with the GOP error. From what I've read this is a problem with the signal coming into the receiver and not the receiver itself.

I'm just wondering if I have a bad multiswitch (or an outdated one) or if it's something else.

Thanks,
TheDude

zabs
01-03-2003, 01:07 AM
I haven't had any extraction issues that I can see so far, but I haven't authored any DVD's yet (just picked up my first burner this past weekend.)

The multiswitch shouldn't affect your signal, but check your transponder strengths to be sure all is well.

I'm not sure about the clicking noise, my multiswitch is outside so I wouldn't be able to hear it if it were making noises.

I did have something weird go on while I was gone a week in december: I had about a day and a half where one of my tivo's didn't record things due to "lack of signal" during the time the program was on (incidentally my other tivo crapped out too, but for other reasons...so I could make no comparison between the two.) Now a day and a half of rain fade is unlikely, but I was thinking that my multiswitch may not be rated for outdoors. Could it have gotten wet and shorted out until it dried? Should I buy a utility box to put it in and keep it out of the rain? Any advice?

BubbleLamp
01-03-2003, 02:37 AM
Originally posted by zabs
Now a day and a half of rain fade is unlikely, but I was thinking that my multiswitch may not be rated for outdoors. Could it have gotten wet and shorted out until it dried? Should I buy a utility box to put it in and keep it out of the rain? Any advice?

Most multi-switches are for indoor or protected cover use only. If yours doesn't explicitly say it is, then it isn't for outdoor usage.

zabs
01-03-2003, 02:39 AM
Something I came across tonight while browsing ebay:

This is from a seller selling a "newer better" multiswitch:
"Other multiswitches offered on eBay, like the RCA units are old-style mechanical switches with internal relays, and do not perform as well..."

Again this is from the guy trying to sell you something so keep that in mind, but it could explain your noise.

Depending on what you paid, and the return policy you may want to take it back and check out ebay anyway. The price is probably better....

zabs
01-03-2003, 02:40 AM
Thanks BL, that's kinda what I figured. I think I'll pick up a little utility box from Home Depot etc. and put the multiswitch inside to give it some protection from the elements.

TheDude83
01-03-2003, 03:59 AM
After checking out eBay I can't believe how much I paid for mine. I think I'll try to take it back. I bought it at RadioShack just a few days before x-mas for about $70. I saw someone on eBay selling the exact same one for $29.99.

What model do you guys recommend? Is Spaun a high quality brand?

This is for indoor use and I only need the 4 outputs, 2 for each Dtivo.

Thanks,
TheDude

JollyBritGiant
02-28-2003, 12:05 PM
Hey

Been talking to the people from 9thTee about their stacker setup, but it won't work for me as I can not put the power inserter on the dish side of the splitter as I can not get 110v power on the roof or anywhere outside for that matter and can not run any more cables though the wall (hence the stacker).

I gather that there are high frequency splitters out there that will pass the DC through to the input so that I can put the inserter down stream...can anyone help out with this by recomending one ?

BubbleLamp
02-28-2003, 12:29 PM
Originally posted by JollyBritGiant
Hey

Been talking to the people from 9thTee about their stacker setup, but it won't work for me as I can not put the power inserter on the dish side of the splitter as I can not get 110v power on the roof or anywhere outside for that matter and can not run any more cables though the wall (hence the stacker).

I gather that there are high frequency splitters out there that will pass the DC through to the input so that I can put the inserter down stream...can anyone help out with this by recomending one ?

I'm pretty sure those splitters will only let you piggback 1 LNB feed with a cable signal or antenna. I don't think they can do dual-LNB feeds over one cable. To do two LNBs, you'd have to be able to separate the 18 volts from the 13 volts. Since the antenna/cable doesn't need the DC for control, they can easily siamese the signal on one cable at a different frequency.

lord_snot
02-28-2003, 04:18 PM
I've got my power inserter on the receiver side of the splitter and it is working just fine (signals in the 90's with the power inserter, weak or no signal without the power inserter). I bought the stacker eqipment from a different vendor but it's the same brand as what 9th tee sells.


Been talking to the people from 9thTee about their stacker setup, but it won't work for me as I can not put the power inserter on the dish side of the splitter as I can not get 110v power on the roof or anywhere outside for that matter and can not run any more cables though the wall (hence the stacker).

BubbleLamp
03-02-2003, 10:18 PM
Originally posted by lord_snot
I've got my power inserter on the receiver side of the splitter and it is working just fine (signals in the 90's with the power inserter, weak or no signal without the power inserter). I bought the stacker eqipment from a different vendor but it's the same brand as what 9th tee sells.

Who'd you buy it from, and was it any cheaper than 9th Tee?

lord_snot
03-02-2003, 10:27 PM
Bought my equipment from wired@home (http://www.wiredathome.com/stacksat.htm) . They are cheaper on some items and more expensive on others.

FredThompson
08-27-2003, 10:14 PM
Long time, no comment on this thread ;)

Can't find the other thread which included a reponse from 9th tee so here somewhat of a repeat:

I've switched from a cable modem to DSL so now all the coax in the walls (courtesy fo the cable company) is free for use.

Many places sell M RJ45 to F Coax adapters for about $5. Should be possible to connect my upstairs and downstairs routers through the coax now. Maybe it will only run at 10 and not 100 but that's acceptable, not preferable, just acceptable.

OK, given that use, can a single feed from the satellite dish be used to run a standalone receiver over that same coax?

I'd sure like to do it for far less than the cost of stackers and all that goes with that. Less money would buy a full wireless setup to join the routers.

Also, regarding the comments about types of coax. What are the bandwidth ratings? How can I tell from the coax jacket what bandwidth it will handle?

BubbleLamp
08-27-2003, 10:59 PM
You can run a single LNB through the cabling, that's what I'm doing now. My in-wall wiring was already RG6, which is what you should have to handle the bandwidth of a sat signal. You'll probably have to pull a wall plate and read the number on the cable itself, the plate won't tell you much. RG59 might work if your run isn't too long, but it's designed for CATV, not sat signals.

I don't think you'll be able to use the coax for both Ethernet and sat signals without some sort of notch-filters.

FredThompson
08-27-2003, 11:39 PM
I've just check and it's all unlabeled. Crud. I guess that means I should pick up a couple of RJ45-coax adapters and see what it will handle.

Notch filters makes sense. What I don't really know is if the bandwidth used by the satellite feed and LAN usage are mutually exclusive. If not, it gets a lot more expensive.

When I was looking into DirecTV one of the clerks at Blockbuster claimed she had a cable modem and DirecTV on the same coax using a stnadard 2:1 splitter. Maybe, but that's not exactly a great endorsement, know what I mean? If she's right, maybe, just maybe, it will all work out.

You know, I don't guess anything would break if I hook it all up and try to run everything full out. If that fails, dropping the LAN to 10 and trying again would be the next step.

If I must, I'll keep using the CAT5 cable I've snaked outside the building (in violation fo my rent) until wireless gets even cheaper. It's not uncommon to see routers and PC cards cheap, try finding a transmitter that plugs into the router.

It's probably a good thing I wasn't here when the carpet was replaced. The floor joists go in the opposite direction of what I'd hoped and the ends extend past the interior walls. I wanted to cut a board out but my installer was more level headed.

Still, would be great to remove that cable and seal the holes...

BubbleLamp
08-28-2003, 12:37 AM
It's a double-sided problem. You need the bandwidth for both forms of traffic, but you also need to have them in their own freq ranges so they don't step on each other. Just changing the speed from 100Mbps to 10Mbps doesn't affect the notch freq that the adapter will use. There are cheap forms of splitters that are designed to put standard antenna signals on the same wire as sat signals, but that works well because OTA signals don't use too much bandwidth. A real cludge might be to put the RJ45 to F-connector AHEAD of one of these splitters on each end of the link and see what happens.

Personally I use powerline bridges to run Ethernet to my Tivo. They are about equal in speed to 10Mbps Ethernet.

PS, not sure what you mean about the transmitter to go into the router??

FredThompson
08-28-2003, 12:43 AM
Powerline bridge? whuzat? Sounds like those "extra" phone lines run as a subcarrier through the electrical wall outlets. Where can I find info about these?

If that's what you're doing, how do you keep your UPS and surge protetors from filtering out that "extra" stuff you do want?

BubbleLamp
08-28-2003, 12:49 AM
Originally posted by FredThompson
Powerline bridge? whuzat? Sounds like those "extra" phone lines run as a subcarrier through the electrical wall outlets. Where can I find info about these?

If that's what you're doing, how do you keep your UPS and surge protetors from filtering out that "extra" stuff you do want?

similar to the phone units, only these are Ethernet bridges. You can't plug them into the UPS for exactly the reason you mention.

Just do a Google search for powerline bridge or HOMEPLUG.

FredThompson
08-28-2003, 01:06 AM
Ah, Ha! Looks like this: http://www.buy.com/retail/product.asp?sku=10341575

However, I just realized when the cable company wires a house, they put a different feed to each room. Given I'm not using their services and the wire is unused, the only real challenge is trying to run both the dish and ethernet over the SAME wire.

Meaning, the coax serving the rooms with the routers can be connected with an F-F coax connector and 2 RJ45-coax adapters like these ($2.67 each): http://www.circuitspecialists.com/prod.itml/icOid/6267

Another wire can be connected to an outlet of the unused dual LNB (oval dish, glad I invest the couple extra bucks) and the standalone receiver connected to it. If it MUST be in my office, I could just snake some coax into the adjoining room. Alternately, since the wall outlets share the same stud (unfortunately, opposite sides of...sigh) I could just poke a hole and run a feed into the other room. The smart way to do this would be with a 90-degree knuckle and go through the back of the office's outlet box.

Sure, I'd have to patch the hole in the wall when I finally leave this rental but that's pretty easy.

It's also a lot cheaper than $130 for 2 of the devices you mention.

This has turned into a pretty darn good thread, hasn't it? Lots of options/methods/discussion of networking.

BubbleLamp
08-28-2003, 01:26 AM
Originally posted by FredThompson
Meaning, the coax serving the rooms with the routers can be connected with an F-F coax connector and 2 RJ45-coax adapters like these ($2.67 each): http://www.circuitspecialists.com/prod.itml/icOid/6267


I highly doubt those $3.00 F to to RJ45 adapters have the required notch filters to assure the freq they use will not interfere with the LNB feed on the same cable. You must segregate the portion of the freq range for each of the two distinct signals you wish to carry over the wire or you'll end up with one or both of them not working.

Do a search on diplexer and you'll see what you need. The things you are looking at just change the physical media, they have no electronics inside.

The one shown here (http://www.emitor.se/accessories/diplexer.htm) will hopefully help you better understand how they put both feeds on one cable, they isolate them to their own portions of the freq range.

FredThompson
08-28-2003, 01:42 AM
Methinks you missed the change.

I'm not going to share the same coax. The office and family room (where the DTiVo lives) will be joined with a F-F coax adapter. Those RJ45-coax adapters will be used on the router in each room to connect to the coax.

One feed of the unused dual LNB will go to coax serving a room which adjoins the office. The rest is explained above.

Granted, this only works because the coax isn't being used for anything now and it will probably only work at 10 instead of 100 but that's really not a big deal.

BubbleLamp
08-28-2003, 01:54 AM
Originally posted by FredThompson
Methinks you missed the change.

I'm not going to share the same coax. The office and family room (where the DTiVo lives) will be joined with a F-F coax adapter. Those RJ45-coax adapters will be used on the router in each room to connect to the coax.

One feed of the unused dual LNB will go to coax serving a room which adjoins the office. The rest is explained above.

Granted, this only works because the coax isn't being used for anything now and it will probably only work at 10 instead of 100 but that's really not a big deal.

Still won't work for Ethernet, the impedence is wrong. There are media converters to go from RJ45 to coax, but most were designed to use old style 50 ohm RG58 or RG62 (could be wrong, it's been a while since I messed with thinnet and arcnet!). You can't just take a port on a device that expects 100 ohm unshielded twisted pair RJ45 and connect it to 75 ohm coax.

Also, the installed coax will be star wired to a central hub. You're going to have to isolate the runs where they terminate at that hub and connect them directly to one another with a male-male F connector. You won't get it to work otherwise.

Oh yea, Ethernet requires 2-pairs, or 4 wires. How are you going to get 4 wires on coax? At best you might get three if the shield isn't tied to ground.

You might be able to use a pair of these (http://www.l-com.com/jump.jsp?lGen=productleader&itemID=6682&itemType=PRODUCTLEADER&iProductID=6682) , but it's still the wrong impedence cable.

If you could find a pair of RJ45/TP to ARCNET adapters, they'd have the right 75 ohm impedence for the coax side.

FredThompson
08-28-2003, 02:58 AM
In my case, all the coax wires go to an access panel in a storage room so it's easily accessible so that's not a problem.

Yup, I'd wondered about 4 conductors vs. 2 but, I will admit, was more interested in what looked like a solution than looking into all of it. Nuts. Just did some looking and you're absolutely correct. Looks like those adapters are really used as a way to extend coax on the cheap.

The devices you linked to are interesting. If I have to spend that kind of money, though, I'll buy the powerline things you mentioned. They look more universal.

Guess the coax stay for a little while then gets replaced with those powerline things and the walls patched before the winter.

FredThompson
08-28-2003, 05:17 AM
Actually, even those powerline things might not be the best option. The Linksys 54G wireless router/access point/whatever thing is $70 after rebate at Amazon.com again. If two of those could be used, it might be a great solution. The cost is almost the same as the powerline devices but throughput should be quite a bit better, even if it's only able to run at 50% due to interference...

vu2vu
08-28-2003, 06:10 AM
deleted bad info