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Anonymouse
05-26-2003, 06:06 PM
(Keywords: 480 720 )

I have a DTivo. It seems the files I download and process with TyStudio are 480x480 when I really expected 720x480.

I looked for settings, couldn't find any. I searched this forum, couldn't find any answers.

QUESTION 1: Am I supposed to be able to get 720x480 video off of my DTivo?

QUESTION 2: If so, what am I doing wrong?

Thanks very much.

P.S. Thanks very much to all those folks putting in their volunteer effort to develop these tools as well as monitor this forum.

falderal
05-26-2003, 08:13 PM
You can not change the resolution that the dtivo records in (you can on the stand alone versions). It is pre-digitized by DirecTV and the dtivo just records that stream.

I'm assuming that you want to make a DVD from the files you extracted. There are a number of workarounds to get the dtivo 480x480 streams onto a DVDR. Do a search for "tystudio dvd" and you will find a lot of threads discussing them.

-falderal

Anonymouse
05-26-2003, 08:53 PM
I find it hard to believe that DirecTV is broadcasting 480x480. That's worse than VHS resolution. I really need verification of this, somehow.

I'm experienced at analog capture and the like, and have produced commercials in the past. I understand satellite transmission and such. I just don't have the specs on it.

koreth
05-26-2003, 09:18 PM
Keep in mind it's 480x480 with no analog noise and a rock-solid time base. It generally looks much better than VHS, though not as good as, say, an SP S-VHS recording of an analog satellite feed.

Anonymouse
05-26-2003, 10:05 PM
Please forgive me, but these aren't answers to my question.

I have a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering, specializing in digital signal processing. I know all about digital and analog and noise.

Digital television editing is done in 720 x 480.

(Sure, 480x480 digital will be better than higher res on VHS. I was just talking about the resolution numbers when I said "worse")

P.S. My question isn't my question anymore, anyway :) . My new question is exactly WHAT resolution is satellite broadcast. I realize this must be what DTiVo's recording. If it's 480x480 I'm gonna be real p*ssed. If so, I think I'll go buy an old Beta formatVCR and beat it against my head. (There's a meaningful joke in there for those who recognize it.)

skorous
05-27-2003, 12:02 AM
AM,

I've been away for a awhile but if I remember correctly DTV broadcasts are generally in 480x480 but 352x480 on certain channels. Somebody will correct me if I'm wrong.

Skorous

EDIT: I should append, are you by satellite you do mean DTV, right? You're not looking for C-band or something, right?

Anonymouse
05-27-2003, 01:14 AM
I've been searching on the web. It's REALLY hard to find technical stuff out there, you know?

Anyway, here's the best reference I've been able to find:

http://www.hei.ca/mpeg2f.html

It explains the encoding history for DirecTV. In a nutshell, it explains that the codec's used to encode the programs are adjustable from 352 x 240 to 720 x 480. They use different settings for different content.

Now, I've always known that they give some shows more bandwidth (sports, yuk) and other shows less bandwidth. I haven't concerned myself with the mechanism they used for this. I naturally assumed the mechanism was more akin to the low-quality vs. high-quality setting for creating a jpg, as one might do from Adobe Photoshop. Note that in this jpg case, the pixel resolution is unchanged, although quality and file size change.

Well, the implication at http://www.hei.ca/mpeg2f.html is that pixel resolution may be what's being used directly as this bandwidth adjustment mechanism. I can't be sure from what I read. There might still be some other quality setting.

Anyway, this reference implies that we might have beaming through our heads from outer space signals with all manner of pixel resolutions. Still can't be sure.

Inside DTiVo, I'm convinced as should be everyone else that TiVo simply records the satellite data stream straight to disk, no encoders necessary (spell that "cheap" or "fast", as in dual tuner).

This, of course, would imply that the data streams have all manner of pixel resolutions and that whatever video codec is used to convert the MPEG to component or composite video output necessarily adjusts to produce the necessary NTSC signal timing.

Well, it might be time to look inside the TyServer code. If they're always producing 480x480, I can't imagine that they're intentionally converting higher or lower res to that. This would make no sense. (By the same reasoning, I fear the 480x480 I'm getting right now is what I'm gonna be stuck with. What a shame. Yet another obstacle in the path of quick output to DVD. Time to find that Beta vcr.)

Or, do I need to record some hi-res sports, and see if it comes out higher than 480x480? Dunno. Since I'm not a sports fan, the closest I could find on my received channels was ESPN, ESPN2, and ESPN CLASSICS. I'll be downloading and testing them.

BubbleLamp
05-27-2003, 01:35 AM
I thought it's always 480x480, they just vary the bit-rate as required/desired. Only HiDef (which current DTivo's can't handle) would have a different size.

captain_video
05-27-2003, 08:10 AM
Every DTivo stream I've ever seen always shows up as 480X480 in DVD Patcher by default. Don't let the resolution numbers fool you. A 480X480 DTivo signal will blow the doors off of ANY existing analog recording format. I used to use S-VHS VCRs exclusively until I bought my first SA Tivo. The SA Tivo and ReplayTVs produce a recorded signal better than any consumer S-VHS recorder I've ever seen (I've owned about 20 different models). A DTivo is a quantum leap above a SA Tivo and is better than anything else I've seen so far other than a Hughes HDR-205 D-VHS VCR and Hughes Platinum DTV receiver combo. The Hughes combo basically records the digital stream directly just like a DTivo but has far too many limitations (i.e. can't fast-forward scan or rewind). Keep in mind that all current recording formats other than DTivo or D-VHS record from an analog source whereas a DTivo records the digital stream directly for a 1-to-1 copy of the original signal with no extraneous processing in the analog domain. Remember that the 480X480 refers to pixels and not horizontal lines of resolution (400 lines for S-VHS). You won't find a higher resolution in any consumer recording format with the exception of a HiDef D-VHS VCR.

Anonymouse
05-27-2003, 11:11 AM
Thanks, Captain_Video.

I know it's much better, I just wanted it much, much better !!!

I guess at this point my complaint is just the extra complexity of getting from this 480x480 format to DVD. I've read about the patching stuff and may/will try it. I don't know, however, if that produces a vanilla DVD that can play on any player, like my old Panasonic, or an off-white DVD that can only play on newer players, like my Apex 1500.

The one thing I really want to avoid is lots of processing time. My old analog route took way too many times real time. I was hoping for a path to DVD faster than real time.

I'll be going back to look at the list of recommended DVD software you wrote to me. For now, my list of remaining problems include:

1) TyIndex won't keep running. Not a big deal, I just load it when I need to freshen the NowShowing list. I'm not interested in remote editing.

2) TyStudio process fails way too much of the time. I have neither the patience nor spare time to twiddle with this. I may have to wait until the great programming guys have an opportunity to clean this understandable mess up.

3) I haven't found a combination yet of TyStudio settings and my DVD software that works at all for vanilla DVD, much less getting to the point to find out if video transcoding is required. I'll address this problem by looking at your recommendations as well as the patcher posts as well as a couple year-old how-to's I've found.

4) By this point, I'll be too tired to worry about how good or bad the DVD menu looks, and perhaps wether or not I want to find a superior mpg stream editor for removing commercials.

captain_video
05-27-2003, 01:40 PM
jdiner just released his latest version of TyTool7r1 in another sticky thread. I'd recommend checking it out as he now has the VOB tools included that will allow you to edit and process a ty file directly to a set of VOB files for burning to DVD. I haven't had a chance to do much with it yet but I'll be playing with it tonight when I get home.

swinokur
05-27-2003, 02:25 PM
I always thought the 480 x 480 was strange, especially because it is *more* than the normal "1/2 D1" MPEG-2 encoding.

(D1 = 720 x 480, 1/2 D1= 360 x 480, with pixel halving/doubling on encode decode.)

I guess 480 horizontal is 60% d1 ;-)

Basically you give up horizontal resolution, for bitrate. Nevertheless, there are lots of times on DTV where I see macroblocking/pixelation during fast action.

[aside: boy I'd sure love an onscreen display of the bitrate...]

rpongett
05-27-2003, 04:03 PM
(1) I've recorded and burned sports from ESPN, ESPN2, several of the Fox Sprorts Regional network, NBATV and ESPN Gameplan. I have never observed anything other than 480x480 resolution. I think the link you found re DirecTV encoding is wrong. In fact, if anything, I've found the sports channels to often get less bandwidth (reflected in MB/min in my .ty files) rather than more (but stay at 480x480 resolution). That's likely because the sports networks are willing to go to lower bandwidth (occassionally depending on other channel usage on their transponder, or even permanently) to get better revenue streams on their affilliation agreements with DirecTV. Even though sports channels theoretically would require more bandwidth.

(2) Don't worry about processing time. Go to the thread probably at the top of this Forum and download Tytool7r1 and associated DVD tools. Jdiner just uploaded them for us last night. Amazing job. After a few extremely minor filename and directory bugs he's fixing today, this application will take you directly from .ty files on your Tivo to burnable DVD file structures, with no transcoding. And perfect audio sync. You can even edit them. And create simple DVD menus.

Anonymouse
05-27-2003, 04:16 PM
rponget,

Thanks VERY much for item (2) ref for "directly from .ty files on your Tivo to burnable DVD file structures, with no transcoding..." I really burned myself out spending 3hrs babysitting (30 minutes active work) per 40 minute Babylon5 episode (analog capture), two whole seasons worth, and now my wife's bought them on DVD.

Regarding satellite resolution and bandwidth, perhaps the real answer is that we can't get the real answer and that the real answer no longer matters since 480x480 is what we're seeing!!!! :)

---

As an aside about quality, I suspect what I'll eventually get on DVD is going to look real good, but still not hold a candle to factory DVD quality. Therefore, I have and will buy DVD's. This is just to point out that me, and probably many like me, are NOT doing this to get around copyrights or to save money. It's about having an archive by some means, preferrably factory produced and purchased, but hand made if that's not available.

P.S. FYI, my XSVCD's through analog capture and 720x480 LSX mpg encoding looked almost as good as DTiVo replay directly on my TV.

rpongett
05-27-2003, 04:22 PM
As an aside about quality, I suspect what I'll eventually get on DVD is going to look real good, but still not hold a candle to factory DVD quality. Therefore, I have and will buy DVD's. This is just to point out that me, and probably many like me, are NOT doing this to get around copyrights or to save money. It's about having an archive by some means, preferrably factory produced and purchased, but hand made if that's not available.I buy everything I've ever recorded when it comes out on DVD. Just did it for newly DVD-released Simpsons and Family Guys that I had previsouly recorded. I don't do this to rip off the content providers, either. In fact, I like rewarding content producers I enjoy enough to record. I just do it to record quality material when its not otherwise available.

captain_video
05-27-2003, 06:45 PM
As an aside about quality, I suspect what I'll eventually get on DVD is going to look real good, but still not hold a candle to factory DVD quality.

That is an absolutely true statement. However, what you will get on DVD will look as good as the original DTV feed since you're recording the digital stream directly to disc and never exposing the stream to the analog domain until you view it on your TV. Depending on the size of your display, you may not see all that much difference between a commercial DVD and what you record from a DTivo until you start getting above 27-32" for your TV screen. You'll definitely see the difference when you get into the larger RPTV sets.

Anonymouse
05-27-2003, 08:23 PM
I agree with you, Captian_video, on satellite quality vs DVD vs TV viewing. In fact, as I mentioned before, my XSVCD's were almost as good as satellite.

Another factor there that I've wondered about is if the DTiVo reduced quality any vs having just a satellite box. I guess it really shouldn't, since they're dealing with the same source material. Only variation might be quality of codec, which can sometimes be a factor.

Also, I have a 60" panasonic rear projection with proscan. I'm real happy with it. NOT hdtv.

Well, I think this thread's had it! I'm going to research rpongett's suggestion.

-bye
-oo

(remember those??!?!?!?! -oo)

captain_video
05-28-2003, 08:13 AM
If you're talking about the quality of the DTV signal through a DTivo vs. a SA DTV receiver, there shouldn't be any difference. The DTivo just buffers the digital data to the hard drive first so you're actually seeing a playback of the recorded signal and not a straight feedthru. This is how you're able to buffer up to 30 minutes of any program from the time you tune to any given channel.

Pro-289
06-02-2003, 08:09 PM
Originally posted by captain_video
The DTivo just buffers the digital data to the hard drive first so you're actually seeing a playback of the recorded signal and not a straight feedthru.
Have you ever seen or heard of anyone testing a DTivo and a non-DTivo side-by-side? I'd be interested in knowing the delay, if any, from watching a live DTivo compared to a live regular directv sat.

SR712
06-02-2003, 08:46 PM
About a second or so.

Expectations
06-11-2003, 06:28 AM
Originally posted by captain_video
A DTivo is a quantum leap above a SA Tivo and is better than anything else I've seen so far other than a Hughes HDR-205 D-VHS VCR and Hughes Platinum DTV receiver combo. The Hughes combo basically records the digital stream directly just like a DTivo but has far too many limitations (i.e. can't fast-forward scan or rewind).

I still use the DirecTV D-VHS VCR for archiving movies or concerts while I use DTiVo for most of my daily viewing. Has anybody figured out anyway to do direct to digital recording from DirecTV D-VHS to PC and ultimately DVD using the port on the back of the VCR? The port accepts a 6-pin firewire cable although I know it is not truly a firewire port. The recordings on D-VHS unlike DTiVo still include the SAP, and DD audio or analog audio, English or Spanish can be selected during playback of the recording. With DTiVo only the audio program selected during recording can be accessed and I assume only that data is recorded on the hard drive. I am not sure if the ability to select SAP could be transfered to DVD from D-VHS but if it could be, that would be an advantage to using D-VHS. It would require software to enable a PC to communicate with the HDR-205 which will probably never be developed or may not even be possible for all I know since nothing other than a DirecTV receiver can communicate with one of these VCRs.

Anyway if you know of any information on getting the HDR-205 to work with a PC, I would appreciate a link. Even other D-VHS VCRs such as the Mitsubishi HS-HD2000U or JVR 30000U can't deal with the DirecTV data recorded by the HDR-205 as far as I know. Since these VCRs have been discontinued for years, I realize it is probably hopeless but I thought I would ask here.

Chris

Expectations
06-11-2003, 06:28 AM
Originally posted by captain_video
A DTivo is a quantum leap above a SA Tivo and is better than anything else I've seen so far other than a Hughes HDR-205 D-VHS VCR and Hughes Platinum DTV receiver combo. The Hughes combo basically records the digital stream directly just like a DTivo but has far too many limitations (i.e. can't fast-forward scan or rewind).

I still use the DirecTV D-VHS VCR for archiving movies or concerts while I use DTiVo for most of my daily viewing. Has anybody figured out anyway to do direct to digital recording from DirecTV D-VHS to PC and ultimately DVD using the port on the back of the VCR? The port accepts a 6-pin firewire cable although I know it is not truly a firewire port. The recordings on D-VHS unlike DTiVo still include the SAP, and DD audio or analog audio, English or Spanish can be selected during playback of the recording. With DTiVo only the audio program selected during recording can be accessed and I assume only that data is recorded on the hard drive. I am not sure if the ability to select SAP could be transfered to DVD from D-VHS but if it could be, that would be an advantage to using D-VHS. It would require software to enable a PC to communicate with the HDR-205 which will probably never be developed or may not even be possible for all I know since nothing other than a DirecTV receiver can communicate with one of these VCRs.

Anyway if you know of any information on getting the HDR-205 to work with a PC, I would appreciate a link. Even other D-VHS VCRs such as the Mitsubishi HS-HD2000U or JVR 30000U can't deal with the DirecTV data recorded by the HDR-205 as far as I know. Since these VCRs have been discontinued for years, I realize it is probably hopeless but I thought I would ask here.

Chris

captain_video
06-11-2003, 07:58 AM
Anyway if you know of any information on getting the HDR-205 to work with a PC, I would appreciate a link.

Lotsa luck finding anything. I literally scoured the web for years and never came up with anything. Ironically, the most comprehensive article I found about using the HDR-205 was in a post I wrote myself in the AVS Forums. It really cracked me up because I had totally forgotten that I wrote it until I saw the signature at the end of the article. AFAIK, there is no way to interface an HDR-205 with a PC for video extraction. You are correct in that it does have a port that is identical to a firewire port but it is not a true IEEE-1398 interface. Unless someone has the wherewithall to write a set of drivers for this device, you're pretty much SOL.

Since the HDR-205 essentially records the DTV digital stream directly, and probably in the identical format that a DTivo does, it is incompatible with any other D-VHS VCRs on the market, except the Hitachi and RCA (?) clones of the 205. I sold both my HDR-205 and companion Hughes Platinum receiver quite a while back since the DTivo was much simpler to use and provided the exact same features and then some. In fact, I don't use VCRs hardly at all anymore, except for occasionally offloading a program from the DTivo to videotape for a friend. The HDR-205 was an innovation at the time it was introduced. No other device at that time could record the digital DTV stream intact and also capture Dolby Digital soundtracks, with the exception of the Dish PVR.

It was great for archiving movies but for timeshifting shows with commercials it was a royal PITA. You had to guess where the end of the commercial break was located since it dropped completely out of Play mode and went into fast forward with no picture on the screen. The counter jumped in chunks and never stopped where you wanted it. My advice would be to get yourself a DVD burner and a Turbonet adapter for your DTivo and archive your shows to DVD-R/-RW (or +R/+RW if you so desire). Your archive collection will take up far less space, you can fast forward and fast rewind while viewing the picture, your Dolby Digital soundtracks will remain intact, you can cut out the commercials using TyTool or TyStudio and get more shows on a disc, and free up more space in your home entertainment cabinet since you won't need either the DTV receiver or D-VHS VCR. In other words, there are few, if any, cons involved with going the route I suggested and almost nothing but pros.

Pro-289
06-13-2003, 02:11 AM
Anyone notice when you take an image you save from TyStudio, 480x480, and stretch it to 640x480 then it looks like the correct aspect ratio?

Looks like DirecTV is skimping on 160 horizontal pixels, 76800 pixels per interlaced frame. What a rip. They squish the 640x480 images to 480x480, then we get'm and stretch'm back to 640x480 to display. Wonder how much of an improvement you'd see if they did sent the full 640 width. Kind of reminds me of the Windows logo_.sys files.

Anonymouse
06-13-2003, 04:06 AM
Note that my Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering may help with concepts and mathematics, but it doesn't help with the specifics of applications that I haven't studied. Nevertheless, is does help me to catch on to those application specifics quicketly.

However, the whole D1 redpath fractional gobbledygook for TV transmission still evades me after an accumulated 30 or 60 minutes of reading on the web.

Notwithstanding that fact, I speak counter to Pro-289's post. I believe it may be that the 480 pixels per line provided by DirecTV is perfectly appropriate for the corresponding original broadcast quality signals that they forward to us, based on some 1950's calculation involving that old indian in the target!

Remember, God, or god, or dog and the Queen if you prefer, did not specify that pixels had to be square.

Will
06-13-2003, 05:56 AM
Originally posted by Anonymouse
some 1950's calculation involving that old indian in the target!

Well, you motivated me to go down to the basement library and pull a few volumes off the shelf. I actually can't find the venerable Indian any earlier than the early 1960's, but in fact I have a strong recollection of having seen him in reference books going back to the 40's; alas my library is too slim.

Anonymouse
06-13-2003, 02:11 PM
Please note that my last post was written around 4am. quicketly? What the h*ll was that?

Pro-289
06-14-2003, 06:35 PM
The ratio of 640:480 is 4:3. But looks like DirecTV uses a 3:3 ratio.

Here's an interesting reading about Screen Resolutions and Video Formats (http://futuretech.mirror.vuurwerk.net/resvid.html).

It just would have been nice if they could have actually used the max 4:3 resolution of 640x480. But that would be more bandwidth usage. I wonder if they're ever going to encode even lower to make room for HD content. I could see them using 300x300 or VHS quality.

BillK
11-27-2004, 10:10 PM
Sorry if I'm stating the obvious here. Many might think, "duh" but here's what I needed to know that was not obvious from any posts I've read.
I was looking for info on getting back to the correct resolution myself and couldn't find this piece of information. It is that when you watch anything on your dtivo I assumed it was stretched so that it fits the screen without clipping any image off the sides. It does clip the image and I wasn't thinking too hard or I would have known I asked for the impossible. I took an extraction and turned it to DVD(TYTOOLS rocks). I was bummed that the DVD was clipped compared to the extraction running on the PC, which was in 480*480. But when I compared it to the same video playing on the dtivo, the DVD was identicle on every frame I examined. So anything I can watch with dtivo will look exactly the same if turned to dvd with no resizing.

malfunct
11-27-2004, 11:57 PM
The ratio of 640:480 is 4:3. But looks like DirecTV uses a 3:3 ratio.

Here's an interesting reading about Screen Resolutions and Video Formats (http://futuretech.mirror.vuurwerk.net/resvid.html).

It just would have been nice if they could have actually used the max 4:3 resolution of 640x480. But that would be more bandwidth usage. I wonder if they're ever going to encode even lower to make room for HD content. I could see them using 300x300 or VHS quality.

You are making a mistake in thinking that the native resolution and the aspect ratio have anything to do with each other. NTSC is 720x480 displayed in 4:3 aspect ratio and DTivo records in 480x480 to be displayed with a 4:3 aspect ratio. Native resolution and the aspect ratio of the display are not necessarily related. If your media player is having trouble displaying 480x480 with a 4:3 aspect ratio then you need a new player.

EDIT: If you play dtivo video at 1:1 aspect ratio it looks funny because the horizontal is "squished".

malfunct
11-27-2004, 11:58 PM
Sorry if I'm stating the obvious here. Many might think, "duh" but here's what I needed to know that was not obvious from any posts I've read.
I was looking for info on getting back to the correct resolution myself and couldn't find this piece of information. It is that when you watch anything on your dtivo I assumed it was stretched so that it fits the screen without clipping any image off the sides. It does clip the image and I wasn't thinking too hard or I would have known I asked for the impossible. I took an extraction and turned it to DVD(TYTOOLS rocks). I was bummed that the DVD was clipped compared to the extraction running on the PC, which was in 480*480. But when I compared it to the same video playing on the dtivo, the DVD was identicle on every frame I examined. So anything I can watch with dtivo will look exactly the same if turned to dvd with no resizing.

The clipping is caused because (most) TV's overscan.

BillK
11-28-2004, 12:33 AM
I originally hoped that the 480*480 format was squished so that it would fit a 4:3 aspect ratio. It looks like I wrongly concluded that this was not the case based on the dtivo output to my TV. I am amazed that the TV takes so much perimeter from the video. I guess I'll get out a ruler and scale it to the correct image on the PC's media player and see what it comes to in pixels. I'd guess its a lot, like 50 pixels horizontally and a similar amount on the verticle.

malfunct
11-28-2004, 01:52 AM
I originally hoped that the 480*480 format was squished so that it would fit a 4:3 aspect ratio. It looks like I wrongly concluded that this was not the case based on the dtivo output to my TV. I am amazed that the TV takes so much perimeter from the video. I guess I'll get out a ruler and scale it to the correct image on the PC's media player and see what it comes to in pixels. I'd guess its a lot, like 50 pixels horizontally and a similar amount on the verticle.

I think they figure 10% vertical and 20% horizontal for overscan guard area. You can look up the exact amount online. People who put video together for broadcast need to know this so they don't put logos or text off the screen.

BillK
11-28-2004, 02:24 AM
The freeware DVD viewers that I have for windows choke on the DVD's I make from TYTOOLS, so I didn't get to look at the actual DVD's on the PC, just the ty files. I booted suse and looked at the DVD's to verifiy what was happening. It confirmed that the whole screen was there.
Too bad my 8 year old zenithTV doesn't seem to have a service mode. I've tried to activate it with the instructions I've found and I never get a service menu that allows me to adjust geometry. Maybe an LCD is on the horizon after all.

jmhddbf
12-08-2004, 04:53 PM
Having some brainfarts myself with the aspect ratios...

Did some searching and found this:
http://www.dealdatabase.com/forum/showpost.php?p=108440&postcount=16

So now I know I can get my programs forced to record at a more standard-looking 720x480.

However, I've got some files that I want to archive that are still at 480x480.
They'll play in Windows Media Player at the proper 4x3 ratio.

However, they're still in native .ty format. So to be able to do other things with them, I have to convert to mpeg in TyTool. That gives me a standard mpeg file... but playing in the 480x480 pixel ratio... which I assume is because this time around, there's no flag present to tell the player to stretch the video. (Or more accurately, to display the non-square pixels correctly.)

I know if I go through with each step in TyTool... I'll (eventually) get a vob file that will be burned on DVD and displayed at 4x3. However, for some of my shows, I don't want them on DVD. Many times, I'm just trying to save a short clip from a show and keep it on my hard drive for now.

I've looked on download.com for programs that will take the 480x480 mpeg and either stretch it, or convert it to something else. But... most of the programs are fubar.

Do you guys know of one that will add the "4x3" flag to these short mpegs without a whole conversion?

Oh, and here's another dumb noob question... Now that I've fixed the bitrate "resolution" numbers and will force the TiVo to record in 720x480... Will that still look wrong? Is there a way to force the TiVo to record in a standard 1.33:1 shape? Or some simple (read:free) program out there that will convert an mpeg to that shape without loss of quality?

Thanks in advance for any tips you can give... and thanks to jdiner for a great program and everyone here for their help.

sanderton
12-08-2004, 05:04 PM
Use Media Player Classic, or one of the other players which lets you change the aspect ratio on playback.

jmhddbf
12-10-2004, 06:33 PM
Yep... have that prog... love it. But when I burn the mpegs to disc and play them in other computers without MPC, I run into the aspect ratio problem. Installing MPC on those boxes is not an option.

Oh, and the newly recorded programs under the new resolution settings still come out inherently 480x480. (Yes, I restarted the TiVo. Yes, I had pressed enter after each resolution change. Yes, I erased the programs from the ToDo list and rescheduled them.)

However, I don't mind that... IF I can find a program that will re-record the mpegs with the proper AR.

sanderton
12-10-2004, 07:08 PM
Try DVDPatcher.

http://www.videohelp.com/tools?tool=DVDPatcher

I've used it on VOBs with some success.

sanderton
12-10-2004, 07:11 PM
(Yes, I restarted the TiVo. Yes, I had pressed enter after each resolution change. ).

Did you click Update Resources?

jmhddbf
12-10-2004, 08:28 PM
Aye cap'n, me did!

A little wierd. Kinda similar to same problem I ran into a few months back. No biggie though. For now MPC is fine. Not really in a rush to distribute clips yet. (will be later, though) I'll look into that DVDPatcher proggie... thanks!!!