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tvfan
04-04-2004, 02:58 AM
I have gone through all the boards on the site and there is a ton of great information. I am pretty technically inclined, but I am getting confused with all the different ideas & suggestions everywhere. I really appreciate anyone who can help me out or point me to the right place...

Here is my situation...

Here is the equipment I have....

-I have a Hughes Direct/Tivo HDVR2
-I have a DSL connection with a dynaminc IP Address (not static).
-I have an Asante DSL Router
-I have an Apple Computer Running OSX
-I have a Toshiba laptop running Windows XP Professional

Here is what I want to do....

-I am leaving the country and want to be able to watch programs that have been recorded on my Tivo over the internet.

From all I have read here, that seems possible...I am just a little confused of the easiest and most stable way to get it done.

If someone could walk me through a step by step on how to do this and whether it is even possible with my equipment and internet connection at home I would really appeciate it!
FYI- I have not hacked into my Tivo...so I would need to know if that is necessary and how to do that.

Thanks so much!

TVFan

sanderton
04-04-2004, 05:09 PM
Wow, that is jumping in the deep end. The hack which lets you stream video ove a regular internet connection is provbably the most complictated hack in the book.

It's here:

http://www.wiskars.com/tystreamer/

but believe me, you don't want to start with that one!

lart2150
04-04-2004, 05:30 PM
I would say extract the files then burn them to a dvd and mail them unless you have a nice upload on your dsl >= 786

another way to go is if the shows you watch are big shows you can download them with bittorrent. http://www.torrents.co.uk/ (there are a few others but this one get's them out first for the most part)

tvfan
04-04-2004, 05:43 PM
thanks for the link.

is there something else that you would suggest that would be simpler?

maybe being able to access my tivo remotely over the internet and transferring shows to my computer in order to watch them?

thanks for your help!

sanderton
04-04-2004, 06:04 PM
Any of the TiVo to PC extraction methods will work over the internet, but there are two big issues: 1) Speed and 2) Security.

Most home connections have an uplink speed of 256 kb/s (=64KB/s), while most TV programmes are around the 600KB/s mark, so it will take at best 10 mins to transfer 1 min of video - and in practice much longer.

And none of the video transfer mechanism have ANY security, so you'de be opening up your home network to the internet. Not recommended.

lart2150
04-04-2004, 07:35 PM
tunnel mfs_ftp with ssh or vpn

hdvr_too
04-08-2004, 10:01 PM
So begins the naritive....

I wanted a similar solution for my frequent rotations to 3rd shift as a tech on a large fiber optic network. Basicly I stare at the screens all night waiting for stuff to happen. Then I got the idea to "broadcast" or stream my tivo over my broadband internet and control it with tivoweb.
I was very happy with the mplayer or windows media player approach but it took at least 4MB to stream live and that was for the most part only something that was recording. So this solution was obviously not tailored for anything but home networking.
At last I realized the power of windows media encoder. It could take my DV input from my camera, compress it on the fly and stream very nice 320x240 live video at 160k. It also acts as a server for remote connections using windows media player.
So I said screw the ethernet and plugged my Dv camera straight into the RCA out of the tivo and then DV into the computer. VIOLA! instant gratification! Since I could control the tivo functions via tivoweb I now have a tivo anywere that has a cable/dsl internet connection.
The best part is that the Windows Media Encoder 9 only uses about 10% of my 2.0GHZ CPU. Very adequate! So I can let it run in the backround if I choose and forget about it.
I recently added a wireless setup with a radio shack fm modultor for the A/V so I could keep my tivo in the living room and not run cables to the computer. I also had to find a more permanant solution to the analogue to digital conversion than my DV cam, so I bought a plextor USB 2.0 capture device.
There are many cheap capture cards out there that claim good results but only work well with thier own propietary software. About 80% of them use the exct same chipset to do the hardwork. trust me when I say buy an external solution! it will be worth it.

End naritive
HDVR_too

rpongett
04-14-2004, 09:57 PM
At last I realized the power of windows media encoder. It could take my DV input from my camera, compress it on the fly and stream very nice 320x240 live video at 160k. It also acts as a server for remote connections using windows media player.
So I said screw the ethernet and plugged my Dv camera straight into the RCA out of the tivo and then DV into the computer. VIOLA! instant gratification! Since I could control the tivo functions via tivoweb I now have a tivo anywere that has a cable/dsl internet connection.
The best part is that the Windows Media Encoder 9 only uses about 10% of my 2.0GHZ CPU. Very adequate! So I can let it run in the backround if I choose and forget about it.

End naritive
HDVR_tooI like this. I have an old ATI TV Wonder card lying around that I know works with Windows Media Encoder. Why not run Tivo output to it and control Tivo output via Tivowebplus?

Two questions:
(1) What protection are you using? SSL?
(2) If you used SSL and used orenosp on the same computer you run Windows Media Encoder, how did you set that up?

rpongett
04-15-2004, 06:52 PM
I set up Windows Media encoder off of a cheap capture card yesterday, and it works great through even my basic DSL upload at 195Kbps. Just controlling what Tivo plays through Tivowebplus 1.0 and watching the video elsewhere.

I'm having problems settnig up an SSL connection for it. Anyone tried this?

osetivo
05-14-2004, 10:14 AM
Bump

I'm also looking for a better solution to streaming over the internet from the TiVo (as well as local files on an XP box).

Question: Can Windows Media Encoder ( WME ) be activated remotely, preferrably from within something like TivoWeb's Now Showing list, to start the encoding and broadcasting of a show on the Tivo? (If so, anyone doing this, and of course, how are you doing it?) Basically Video on demand ( VOD )

Couple of my nOObish thoughts on the subject.

1. I have looked briefly through the ETivo thread, which seems to be the closest thing I have seen, but I'm not looking for storage or pre-encoding the Tivo files.
2. Tystreamer requires a linux server which I don't have.
3. I have used Windows Media Encoder to encode/broadcast a "Live Feed" from the TiVo using a video capture card from Tivo's RCA/S-Video. Trouble is I have to leave WME broadcasting 24/7, I haven't figured out how to turn on the "live feed" encode/broadcast remotely. I would prefer streaming from Tivo's HD
4. Using Remote Desktop" to connect and launch WME to broadcast a local file is not very "user friendly".
5. I know d70 is working on "live streaming" via TyShow, and has also indicated he's looking into TyShow/WME encoding issues, so I figure these would be important pieces to the puzzle.

/End of rambling post

TIA

Masnark
05-14-2004, 12:39 PM
Hi,

Consider the following:

1. Windows Media Encoder cannot, as far as I know, broadcast a stream. Only files and live captures. This basically means you will need either to do the video card capture trick, or to have something that automatically downloads TY files and broadcasts them for you.

2. Using a video capture card to do all this should work great. However. If your uplink is in the vicinity of ~256kb, your image would be pretty bad, especially since you cannot do 2-pass encoding on live streaming.

3. You can do something that will not broadcast WMVs constantly, but on demand. But that means you will need to purchase (and probably set up which will be a pain), Windows Media Server. Those don't come cheap.

4. This might not apply to you, it did for me though. If you have other people in the house while you are away, they may want to watch TiVo while you want to too. That might prove to be problematic.

That's the reasoning that made me write EtiVo. If you do not need it for it's archiving capabilities, then just dont activate AutoTivo. Manually queue shows, and depending on the speed of your computer, 20min to 60min after queuing a show, it will be ready for you. You can then just go and delete it when you are done watching.

Just a thought - I went through the same exact thing.

Abone9
05-14-2004, 04:20 PM
I faced a similar situation and because I only have 256k upstream as well and etivo was my best solution. While it streams just fine on my internal network my upstream cap just didn't allow for streaming without huge buffering times. But what etivo was designed to do it does very well. I turned on the autotivo function and it archived all the shows in windows media format rather quickly. Then through the broadband connection I had at my hotel during business travel I was able to download a show and watch it at my leisure. I would suggest that you definately give etivo a shot! Tystreamer also is a very nice app for those mac users like me out there. It has high quality streaming suitable for streaming over an internal network but as far as I know does not work very well for broadband connections with slow upstream speeds.

My 2 Cents

osetivo
05-14-2004, 04:21 PM
1. Windows Media Encoder cannot, as far as I know, broadcast a stream. Only files and live captures. This basically means you will need either to do the video card capture trick, or to have something that automatically downloads TY files and broadcasts them for you.

Ah, that what I was afraid someone would say. I was just thinking if WMP can access, pull, and play the files (I forget if it's via mfs_ftp or vserver), then WME could do the same, but I guess it's "streaming a stream". :(

I was hoping something like initiate a mfs_ftp transfer, delay x seconds and stream the resulting file.


Manually queue shows, and depending on the speed of your computer, 20min to 60min after queuing a show, it will be ready for yoy.

Ah, I was wondering if you could stream before it was through processing(assuming single pass), I guess not.

Thanks for the repy and nice job with ETiVo.

Masnark
05-14-2004, 06:14 PM
Ah, I was wondering if you could stream before it was through processing(assuming single pass), I guess not.

Thanks for the repy and nice job with ETiVo.

Actually, either on the next version, or the one after, this will be possible. I just didnt do it because, well, I am lame. It wont be perfect, but it actually should work smoothly. WME9 doesn't lock the file.

You can actually try it out today and see how it's working by enabling directory browsing and going to a show you already started encoding.

TheAvatar
05-14-2004, 10:27 PM
This will be cool! You could monitor the speed of encoding and make the file availible for viewing when the Amount of time required to complete the encoding is less than the length of the already encoded portion. That was it will finish encoding while you are still downloading.

Of course this would be dependent on the upstream speed of you connection at home, so maybe some variable could be set by the end user to define at what % the file is available.

This will at least shorten the time between when you first select a show and you can view it.


Actually, either on the next version, or the one after, this will be possible. I just didnt do it because, well, I am lame. It wont be perfect, but it actually should work smoothly. WME9 doesn't lock the file.

You can actually try it out today and see how it's working by enabling directory browsing and going to a show you already started encoding.

tryingtogetby
05-19-2004, 02:51 AM
I am moving as well. I have been looking for a similar solution. My choice has been www.snapstream.com-BeyondTV3. There is an option for live streaming tv. You can also open the same stream in WMP. The downside is that you have to leave a computer running 24/7 and some ports open. But since there is nothing else on that computer, I can live with it. I can control the DTivo using TWP remote. Not a great picture, but I am going to try and get some more bandwidt and see. On my last trip, I did manage to watch a few NBA games live and I was just in heaven. Another positive is that you can also use your PC as a PVR which gives me a few more GBs to play with. Check it out!

wkozun
05-19-2004, 10:28 PM
Maybe a TiVo isn't the best tool for this. Have you considered Beyond TV which is a TiVo-type solution for PCs? To do this you will need a video capture card - to stream live video you will need a software encoding card (i.e ATI TV-Wonder) although generally a hardware encoding card is better as it takes up fewer CPU resources to encode to MPEG.

With this application you can stream shows or even live TV. You can use a web interface to schedule recordings and to change channels. I have heard of people who stream shows fromthe US to other countries.

Check it out at www.snapstream.com.

osetivo
05-20-2004, 10:54 AM
Rather than repost, click here (http://www.dealdatabase.com/forum/showthread.php?t=34889) to see what I'm thinking of.

CySurflex
12-13-2004, 04:43 PM
1. Windows Media Encoder cannot, as far as I know, broadcast a stream. Only files and live captures. This basically means you will need either to do the video card capture trick, or to have something that automatically downloads TY files and broadcasts them for you.

Theoretically - a "video capture" driver could be written, which will in turn actually just broadcast a TY stream. Windows Media Encoder allows you to select as a source either a FILE or a VIDEO CAPTURE DEVICE.
Also, wasn't somebody working on a windows file share/samba interface to mfs_ftp ? Couldn't that also be selected as the SOURCE file for WME ?



2. Using a video capture card to do all this should work great. However. If your uplink is in the vicinity of ~256kb, your image would be pretty bad, especially since you cannot do 2-pass encoding on live streaming.


My ultimate goal is to stream my TiVo recordings to my Treo 650. The screen resultion is 320x320 and therefore a bitrate of ~200kb would probably be ok (my upstream is at 384kb)



This will be cool! You could monitor the speed of encoding and make the file availible for viewing when the Amount of time required to complete the encoding is less than the length of the already encoded portion. That was it will finish encoding while you are still downloading.

Of course this would be dependent on the upstream speed of you connection at home, so maybe some variable could be set by the end user to define at what % the file is available.


:) At work I recently wrote a functional and techcnical spec for a video player , including specifically the math and logic behind figuring out when enough of the video has downloaded/buffered so that playback can start and will be able to continue uninterrupted until the end of the video. It's not as simple as it sounds - you have to take into account the bitrate, the download speed, the total video length. But of course its doable, and most video players do have this functionality built in.