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swinokur
07-16-2008, 03:03 PM
Has anyone else seen 9.4.L6.01-2-648 pop up on their S3/HD yet?

It has shown up on mine:

bash-2.02# echo mls /SwSystem |tivosh
Directory of /SwSystem starting at ''

Name Type FsId Date Time Size
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
9.3a-01-2-648 tyDb 464677 04/19/08 17:05 908
9.4.L6-01-2-648 tyDb 706268 07/15/08 14:34 876
ACTIVE tyDb 464677 04/19/08 17:05 908

Of course, i'm hesitant to flip the switch without tivoapp patches. :)

jt1134
07-16-2008, 03:08 PM
Has anyone else seen 9.4.L6.01-2-648 pop up on their S3/HD yet?
plenty of people here (http://tivocommunity.com/tivo-vb/showthread.php?t=399394).

Of course, i'm hesitant to flip the switch without tivoapp patches. :)

post a 9.4 tivoapp somewhere and maybe someone will take a look.

swinokur
07-16-2008, 03:45 PM
here y'all go:

94l6tapp.rar - 4.56MB (http://www.zshare.net/download/1543775147007575/)

jt1134
07-16-2008, 04:16 PM
VMA/HEX orig value new value

0x005aa854/0x001aa854 104000AA 100000AA

Looks right. Untested. Buyer beware, etc, etc.

swinokur
07-16-2008, 09:04 PM
so far so good ...

bash-2.02# drmcheck.tcl
DRMCheck.tcl, based on CipherCheck.tcl by AlphaWolf_HK

TyStream encryption is currently disabled.

jt1134
07-17-2008, 06:06 PM
VMA/HEX orig value new value

0x00733338/0x00333338 00008021 24100001
untested, <insert standard disclaimer here>.

swinokur
07-17-2008, 08:36 PM
The "Backdoors Enabled!" message shows up in "system information..."

jt1134
07-18-2008, 12:53 AM
Here's the full superpatch port for 9.4. I still don't have the update, so it's completely untested also. I just got really bored today.


0x0aadd00 "14400026 10400026"
0x0733338 "00008021 24100001"

0x05a4e80 "0c81e670 24020001"
0x05aa854 "104000aa 100000aa"
0x0f39abc "0c14e27f 3c020000"
0x0bdd104 "0c1e08b4 00000000"
0x0bdd198 "0c1e08b4 00000000"
0x0d979bc "0c444a91 00001021"
0x0d9c7f0 "0c1e08b4 00000000"
0x0544b08 "14400008 00000000"
0x0d9d298 "0c444a91 00001021"
0x0d9f070 "0c1bfd7a 00000000"
0x0587750 "0c14e27f 0c3ec339"
0x0fb0cdc "27bdfec8 03e00008"
0x0fb0ce8 "afb40128 24020001"
0x0fb0ce4 "afb00118 8e24000c"
0x0fb0ce8 "afbf0134 8c820000"
0x0fb0cec "afb5012c 8c850004"
0x0fb0cf0 "afb30124 00451025"
0x0fb0cf4 "afb20120 8c850008"
0x0fb0cf8 "afb1011c 00451025"
0x0fb0cfc "8c830010 03e00008"
0x0fb0d00 "8c84000c 00000000"
0x0fb1138 "0c81e040 00001021"
0x0fb1178 "0c81e040 00001021"
0x0fb1524 "0c81e040 00001021"
0x0fb1568 "0c81e040 00001021"
0x110acc4 "0c1e08b4 00000000"
0x110ad28 "0c1e08b4 00000000"
0x1112d98 "0c1e08b4 00000000"
0x1112e24 "0c1e08b4 00000000"
0x110aaf0 "0c1bfd7a 00000000"
0x110aba0 "0c1bfd7a 00000000"
0x110ac38 "0c1bfd7a 00000000"
0x1112b80 "0c1bfd7a 00000000"
0x1112c34 "0c1bfd7a 00000000"
0x1112ce8 "0c1bfd7a 00000000"

jt1134
07-31-2008, 12:13 AM
Finally received 9.4 on one of my TivoHD's today. Looks like it has SDV tuner resolver capabilities with the inclusion of tr.o. I was using a custom 9.3 kernel and it seems to choke when loading tr.o


Loading tr.o
/platform/lib/modules/tr.o: /platform/lib/modules/tr.o: unresolved symbol usb_bulk_msg
/platform/lib/modules/tr.o: /platform/lib/modules/tr.o: unresolved symbol usb_deregister
/platform/lib/modules/tr.o: /platform/lib/modules/tr.o: unresolved symbol usb_free_urb
/platform/lib/modules/tr.o: /platform/lib/modules/tr.o: unresolved symbol usb_alloc_urb
/platform/lib/modules/tr.o: /platform/lib/modules/tr.o: unresolved symbol usb_register
/platform/lib/modules/tr.o: /platform/lib/modules/tr.o: unresolved symbol usb_reset_device
/platform/lib/modules/tr.o: /platform/lib/modules/tr.o: unresolved symbol usb_submit_urb
/platform/lib/modules/tr.o: /platform/lib/modules/tr.o: unresolved symlink_urb
/platform/lib/modules/tr.o:
Hint: You are trying to load a module without a GPL compatible license and it
has unresolved symbols. Contact the module supplier for assistance, only
they can help you.

insmod failed
so in order to use a tuning resolver a 9.4 kernel will need to be used (whenever the resolvers are even available). If you use an older kernel (like one of these (http://dealdatabase.com/forum/showthread.php?t=54047)), make sure to set failSafe=1 in your startup scripts if you weren't already doing so, so that your tivo doesn't crash when it tries to load tr.o.

Also, it appears the usbcore, usb-ohci and ehci-hcd modules have been removed (consolidated in another module somewhere?).

Here's (http://dealdatabase.com/forum/showpost.php?p=297933&postcount=926) a superpatch diff for the lazy ones out there. mildly tested.

ciper
07-31-2008, 03:07 AM
so in order to use a tuning resolver a 9.4 kernel will need to be used (whenever the resolvers are even available). If you use an older kernelmake sure to set failSafe=1 in your startup scripts

Also, it appears the usbcore, usb-ohci and ehci-hcd modules have been removed (consolidated in another module somewhere?).

Inclusion of support for the SDV dongle is great news. I am curious though, what potential side effect could the missing modules have on us?

swinokur
07-31-2008, 03:34 AM
jt: interesting about the tr.o thing. I didn't notice that because I use Jaime's custom kernel and the backport usb modules. tr.o needs usbcore, which I manually load in rc.sysinit.

I will play with the superpatch stuff shortly.

Jamie
07-31-2008, 07:15 AM
9.4 has the usb host drivers built in to the stock kernel (usbcore, ehci-hcd, usb-ohci). As swinokur says, if you use an older custom kernel that doesn't have usb built in, you just need to get the backport usb drivers and make sure they are loaded. Works for me. No errors from the tr.o module load.

jt1134
07-31-2008, 08:16 AM
thanks guys. I had copied over the missing drivers but my startup scripts never loaded them. that did the trick.

swinokur
08-02-2008, 03:52 PM
9.4 (full version) came down last night. the tivoapp that showed up is the same as the tivoapp with L6.

lgkahn
08-06-2008, 08:45 AM
have his on both of my boxes and are rebooting nightly trying to install. what are the exact steps to install this just run /tvbin/installSw.itcl

no custom kernel on my boxes they show
Kernel Information
Version 2.4.20
Compile #1 Fri Mar 21 18:24:17 PDT 2008


should i be ok thanks

jkozee
08-06-2008, 10:16 AM
Running /tvbin/installSw.itcl will install the new software, as will removing the "upgradesoftware=false" from your bootpage and rebooting. However, both of these methods will wipe out your bootpage, custom hacks, and put a stock kernel back on the system, so you will need to pull the drive and repeat your initial steps for hacking.

Alternatively, you can alter the installSw.itcl and disable rebooting to give yourself a chance to hack the box via telntet. You will need a mips version of replace_initrd (and the dummy initrd) or a custom/neutered kernel. The "exact steps" depend on how you've already customized your box and what you expect when your done.

For those not inclined to do this process manually, ScanMan has reported success for 9.4 using his script found here (http://dealdatabase.com/forum/showpost.php?p=288733&postcount=48).

lgkahn
08-06-2008, 10:24 AM
ok thanks didnt wipeout the upgradesoftare on boot parm but must have wiped out kernel as after i pulled the drive and put the rc.sysinit.author and tivoftpd back on it still is not working... so i will pull the drive again and redo the kernel hack.. thanks

psxboy
08-06-2008, 12:10 PM
I can't believe how many people still pull their drives out and re-hack on a PC every time a software upgrade comes down the line. I haven't had to pull my drives at all after the first time I hacked them. ScanMan's script might help some people overcome this particular handicap, but I'm a "do it manually" kinda guy so here's a basic overview of how I handle an upgrade:

(After the new software has been downloaded & Tivo is in "Pending Restart" mode)


Telnet in, set root dir to rw and edit /tvbin/installSw.itcl to remove "reboot" line.

Run installSw.itcl & take note of the new root partition.

Once it's finished, mount the new root partition on /install. (ie. mount /dev/hda4 /install )

Cd to /install & create kernel folder.

Dd new kernel to backup file. (ie. dd if=/dev/hda3 of=/install/kernel/94kernel )
Run replace_initrd on new kernel (I keep the mips version and the null-linuxrc.img.gz in /var/hack) and copy the neutered kernel back to the kernel partition. (ie. dd if=/install/kernel/94kernel_patched of=/dev/hda3 )

I keep tivotools in /tivobin so I create /install/tivobin and extract tivotools.tar to it.

I choose to use a neutered iptables so I copy it from /sbin/iptables to /install/sbin/iptables

Copy /etc/rc.d/rc.sysinit.author to /install/etc/rc.d/rc.sysinit.author

Copy whatever other files and drivers you need to the appropriate subdirs of /install

Patch /install/tvbin/tivoapp (I just use the NoCSO patch, applied with the "echo XXX | dd..." command and since this isn't the currently running tivoapp you don't have to do all the crazy copying first.)

Cd back to /var, umount /install and set root back to ro.

Finally, reboot into an upgraded-but-still-hacked tivo.


I also have a slightly modified partition table with a large hda1 where I keep an emergency root that I can boot into from the prom menu via serial. It boots just far enough to give me a bash prompt that I can use to perform emergency triage if I happen to mess something up. It's also a handy place to store /var backups. Highly recommended. :)

-psxboy

captain_video
08-06-2008, 03:13 PM
I don't always have the time to install the hacks when I see the "Pending restart" status so I usually let the update occur naturally on my S3's. It was a different story when I was running the HDTivos since I could hold off any updates until I could install them manually.

I prefer to pull the drive after taking the update so I can create a virgin backup image before reinstalling the hacks. It's a simple matter of copying the files from the old partition to the new one and neutering the kernel while I have it installed in the PC. Once I copy everything over and create the backup I telnet in and install the tivoapp patches. The process isn't all that much different than the one psxboy uses except it's done with the drive in my PC. Aside from creating the backup image, the time frame for installing the hacks in a Tivo environment vs. a PC is negligible at best.

I always create a backup image for new software so the drive has to get pulled at some point to do it. If I have the notion, I also make a backup of the hacked drive as well so I don't have to reinstall squat if I need to replace the drive for some reason. What I'm surprised at is how many people don't make a backup and are just waiting to get bit in the a$$ from a drive failure. That's something I'd expect from a rookie, not a seasoned Tivo veteran.;) Leaving the drive in the Tivo is certainly convenient, but it's a risk I'm not willing to take.

I have easy access to my Tivos and have maybe one screw holding the drive bracket in place and nothing securing the cover so pulling the drive is no big deal for me. I also have a dedicated PC sitting in a small room about 8 feet from the Tivos that I use strictly for Tivo drive updates.

lgkahn
08-06-2008, 03:34 PM
same here dedicated 486 pc with cd rom permantly installed to boot to unix

no bigee to pull drives and always back up hacked drive so dont have to do squat if they die.. never thought about virgin image but will do it tonight on my other box when i upgrade it...

psxboy
08-06-2008, 03:58 PM
Ah. Well, mine's buried in the entertainment center and is a PITA to disconnect, open up, etc. As far as having a backup, I still have the original untouched drive and I save copies of the upgrade slices as they are downloaded to the Tivo (including a decrypted swsystem slice) so I can always get back to the current state without much hassle in the case of a drive failure.

Also, contrary to some posts, the upgradesoftware=false flag does work to stave off the upgrades. I rarely have time to do the upgrade when it's first downloaded too, even though it only takes about 10-15 minutes (if you don't have to pull the drive ;) ). I usually get to it within a couple of days though.

-psxboy

lgkahn
08-06-2008, 04:04 PM
much nicer when a drive does which on my 5 tivos 1 does yearly to have a full backup of everything including hacks.. then it only takes about 30 minutes to get a new drive going

lgkahn
08-06-2008, 06:15 PM
did one of my series 3's inline the other with pulling drive.. the problem is that there appears to be no way to backup the hacked image with old school mfs live (cannot use winmfs as my pc is old 486 and dont have a convenient xp machine to hook drive up to.. without tearing everything apart)

mfs live backup only works on fat 32 and apparently you cannot backup the 2.8 gig hacked image as it always fails at the end.. smaller virgin image works fine.. any ideas.. or can hacked images now only be backed up with winmfs as mfs live backup does not support ntfs either i believe..

thanks

jt1134
08-06-2008, 06:59 PM
as far as mfslive knows there is nothing different about a hacked drive vs a virgin one.

jkozee
08-06-2008, 08:21 PM
apparently you cannot backup the 2.8 gig hacked image as it always fails at the end.. thanks

try backing up like this:
backup -f 9999 -so - /dev/sda > file.mfs

Writing directly to a file limits it to 2GB, but sending it to stdout and redirecting that to a file works fine, as noted in this (http://mfslive.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=243&st=0&sk=t&sd=a&start=15)thread.

Jamie
08-06-2008, 09:04 PM
fat32 is still limited to 4GiB.

Better to write to ext2/3 or another file system that supports large files.

captain_video
08-07-2008, 07:18 AM
did one of my series 3's inline the other with pulling drive.. the problem is that there appears to be no way to backup the hacked image with old school mfs live (cannot use winmfs as my pc is old 486 and dont have a convenient xp machine to hook drive up to.. without tearing everything apart)

mfs live backup only works on fat 32 and apparently you cannot backup the 2.8 gig hacked image as it always fails at the end.. smaller virgin image works fine.. any ideas.. or can hacked images now only be backed up with winmfs as mfs live backup does not support ntfs either i believe..

thanks
My S3 backup failed right near the end as you indicated but I just deleted some old images on the FAT32 drive that were outdated to free up some space and the backup worked fine on the 2nd try. I'm still using the old PTVUpgrade boot CD for my updates and hacks. I have yet to try WinMFS other than to look at the GUI in Windows.

lgkahn
08-07-2008, 09:25 AM
check out the you tube support now under "download tv movies and web video" undoc. feature of the new 9.4 release sweet.

lrhorer
08-10-2008, 02:32 AM
I don't always have the time to install the hacks when I see the "Pending restart" status so I usually let the update occur naturally on my S3's.
Well, spare time or not, I prefer to have the new image up and working on the TiVo before I hack it. Otherwise, and if something breaks, it may be very difficult to know if it was something I did which broke the box or something related to the upgrade. I've learned through long years of dealing with finicky equipment it is wise to limit the number of vectors for failure, especially during software upgrades. Wild geese abound in the world of digital equipment.


I prefer to pull the drive after taking the update so I can create a virgin backup image before reinstalling the hacks.
That, too. I don't back up the recordings, but I definitely backup the kernel, iptables, and tivoapp. Anything else can usually be fixed while the box is up and running.


It's a simple matter of copying the files from the old partition to the new one
Actually, I make it even simpler on myself than that. I created a tarball of all the files in my hack, including configurations in /etc, the busybox binary and all its symlinks, mfs_utils, TivoWebPlus, and so forth. I store the tarball in a directory named /hack and untarred it to a directory named /tivo on the PC I use to hack the TiVos. If I want to make any changes on the TiVos, I can either create an updated tarball on the TiVo itself and ftp it over to the Linux system, or else update the files in the /tivo directory and then re-tar the /tivo directory by changing to the directory and issuing the command:


tar -cvf /hack/tivohacks.tar *

If I want to make changes to all three TiVos, I can simply ftp the tarball to the tivos and untar it in /. (Gawd, I love Linux!!)

When it comes time to hack a new TiVo or to re-hack an upgraded one, I simply mount /dev/sdb6 or /dev/sdb7 as the case may be onto /tivo and then mount /dev/sdb9 onto /tivo/var. After making backup copies of iptables and tivoapp and splicing in whatever hacks I want into tivoapp, I simply cd to /tivo and issue the command:


tar -xvf /hack/tivohacks.tar

I automated all of this in a simple little script, so I don't forget something or screw it up with a typo. I put up a copy of the script I use here (http://dealdatabase.com/forum/showthread.php?p=297738&highlight=tivoapp#post297738). Using the script, it literally only took me moments to hack the TiVo HD after the PC was powered up. By mounting the primary drive in an Antec MX-1 external housing, I also eliminated the need to disconnect the cables from the TiVo (except power, of course) or to open either the TiVo or the PC. I just plug the Antec MX-1 into the PC, boot up Linux, run the script, and shut down. It literally takes the TiVo longer to boot up and go through its little intro video than it does to hack the unit.


and neutering the kernel while I have it installed in the PC. Once I copy everything over and create the backup I telnet in and install the tivoapp patches.
I do everything while the TiVo drive is mounted, tivoapp patches and all. When I umount the drive partitions and shut down the PC, everything is complete and ready to go.


The process isn't all that much different than the one psxboy uses except it's done with the drive in my PC. Aside from creating the backup image, the time frame for installing the hacks in a Tivo environment vs. a PC is negligible at best.
I don't create an image, just back up the files which get changed with the hacks individually. I have pauses built in to the script so I can see what's going on, but without them, after I input the values for the tivoapp patch, it would take less than 4 seconds to run. Right now I'm only implementing one patch, but I'm considering others, and if I decide to implement them, I'll load the patch values from a file, rather than from the console. That way I can type all the values in the file once, audit the file carefully looking for errors, and then hack as many TiVos as I like in quick succession or spread over time, as I choose.


I always create a backup image for new software so the drive has to get pulled at some point to do it.
I keep the original stock drive on hand, and at some point after the upgrade has shown itself to be stable I put it back in and get it upgraded as well. That gives me a pristine drive from which to work if necessary.


If I have the notion, I also make a backup of the hacked drive as well so I don't have to reinstall squat if I need to replace the drive for some reason.
If the big drive fails, I'll just use Win_MFS to copy the pristine drive over to the new replacement drive and then boot up Linux and hack the upgrade drive.


Leaving the drive in the Tivo is certainly convenient, but it's a risk I'm not willing to take.
That's one reason I never put the drive back in the TiVo, at all. By making the primary drive an external one, the drive never gets removed, it just gets moved, and it never gets replaced, just moved back. It's a piece of cake, now, even for someone disabled as I am.


I have easy access to my Tivos and have maybe one screw holding the drive bracket in place and nothing securing the cover so pulling the drive is no big deal for me.
'Not to get into a peter sizing match, but a single e-SATA cable is even less than a single screw and an unsecured cover. Just as an aside, you and anyone else are perfectly welcome to do whatever you like with your own equipment, but I definitely do not recommend holding down an internal drive with a single screw nor leaving anything unsecured in, on, or around any electronic device. I don't even leave the power and video cables unsecured.


I also have a dedicated PC sitting in a small room about 8 feet from the Tivos that I use strictly for Tivo drive updates.
Well, my TiVos are all in different rooms around the house, so no matter what at least two of them will be more than 50 feet from the PC and in a different room. Actually, right now the PC happens to be sitting in a fourth room, but I intend very soon to put the PC on a shelf right below one of the TiVos, literally less than a meter away. The e-SATA cable will reach, so I won't even have to move the drive when hacking that TiVo. The other two will require me to carry the Antec MX-1 housings into the other room, but even I can manage that.

lrhorer
08-10-2008, 02:56 AM
I'm still using the old PTVUpgrade boot CD for my updates and hacks. I have yet to try WinMFS other than to look at the GUI in Windows.
WinMFS works great for upgrading a stock drive to a new, larger drive. I had trouble doing a secondary upgrade, however, and had to fall back on the stock drive when I upgraded the TiVo HD from a 320G to a 500G. It also won't do a full backup. One can copy drive to drive using WinMFS, but for those of us who prefer to back up the entire system to an intermediate drive and then restore to a newer hard drive, it's not quite so wonderful, unless one has no recordings or doesn't mind losing them.

psxboy
08-12-2008, 02:04 PM
I can see the logic behind all the backing up and fail-safe procedures that everyone does. That's something I would do with data that I consider to be irreplaceable, like personal data on my PCs and laptops. But the Tivo software (and certainly the recordings) I think of as "transient" data - there's nothing unique about it and copies of it exist in any number of places.

From a cost-benefit analysis perspective, it's "cheaper" for me to simply save the upgrade slices and to hack the drive in-place without extensive testing than it is to pull the drive, make a full virgin backup of each software version, test the new software and finally re-hack. While taking the "full backup" route will save me time in the event of a catastrophic drive failure it costs me much more time for each upgrade. And even having a full backup of my hacked drive won't save me much more time than starting from scratch with the original drive would anyway. (Plus, skipping all the drive-pulling and backing up allows me to start an upgrade as little as 30 minutes before primetime without too much fear of missing any recordings.)

Anyway... to each his own. There's certainly nothing wrong with being overly cautious, but if you consider that this isn't exactly your tax return data or family photo albums we're dealing with here you can see how a little time savings over absolute data security might be worth it.

(Of course, if I had lgkahn's problem of 1 dead drive per year I might think about making an interim backup occasionally. I'll probably regret saying this but I have yet to experience a drive failure in all my years of Tivo ownership. Where do you keep your Tivos lgkahn? On a trampoline? ;))

-psxboy

captain_video
08-13-2008, 07:51 AM
Obviously, everyone has different views about how they go about hacking and updating their Tivos. That's one of the great things about this hobby. Depending on how deep you want to get into learning Linux, the possibilities are endless. I'm no Linux guru so I tend to try and keep things simple (i.e., the KISS principle). I've been hacking my Tivos pretty much the same way ever since I got my first HR112 SA Tivo that had a whopping 14 hours of recording capacity. I still remember pouring over the lengthy threads at the AVSForums and rejoicing when they developed Dylan's Boot Disk and BlessTiVo so I could finally upgrade the hard drive.

Hacking methods and Tivo software have gone through many changes since then so I have made numerous adjustments along the way but the basic principle is still the same. I still make backup images of my Tivos out of habit more than anything else. I've rarely had to use a backup image for restoring a failed drive, at least not since the early days using 2.5Xtreme on the S1 DTivos, but the one time I don't back it up will be the time I need it. I don't usually mess with slices and such for restoring a backup. I use Linux so rarely these days that I have to keep refreshing my memory on how to restore the hacks each time I get a software update on my S3's.

I used to keep the original drives on the shelf and use another one for hacking but the drives started piling up after a while and I found other practical uses for them other than collecting dust. It just seemed silly to have a large drive sitting idle when I could have been using it for other purposes.

pentium101
08-16-2008, 11:14 AM
I'm also one who likes to pull the drive and make a backup of the new image before hacking. While I'm in the unit, I take the time to blow out the dust and make sure that everything still looks okay.

lrhorer
08-16-2008, 08:46 PM
I still make backup images of my Tivos out of habit more than anything else. I've rarely had to use a backup image for restoring a failed drive, at least not since the early days using 2.5Xtreme on the S1 DTivos, but the one time I don't back it up will be the time I need it.
That's the thing about backups. They are a pain in the butt, and a total waste of time and effort whenever they are not needed. All it takes is one failure on the part of some component, however, to suddenly make all the pain and wasted time become a tiny fraction of the pain and trouble, as well as time, of trying to recover data without a backup.


I don't usually mess with slices and such for restoring a backup. I use Linux so rarely these days that I have to keep refreshing my memory on how to restore the hacks each time I get a software update on my S3's.
I use Linux daily (and HP-UX, and Solaris, and OS/2, and unfortunately Windows), but I certainly don't hack my TiVos daily. That's why I wrote the little hack script I posted here (http://dealdatabase.com/forum/showthread.php?p=297738#post297738). Of course, each time I do a different upgrade I need to modify the script just a bit, but as much as making the upgrade process quick and easy, the point of the script is to keep track of all the basic requirements for hacking the TiVo in one compact place. After years of maintaining my Series I, hacking the series III (THD, actually) the first time was a worrisome and difficult process. There are lots of references in the forum to hacking various platforms, but it was extremely time consuming to find out which hacks for the Series II were valid for the Series III and which were not. I don't mind doing research, but I detest doing research which sends me on a wild goose chase, and not knowing what was still valid and what wasn't, it was impossible to know whether I should pay attention to any particular piece of advice or not.


I used to keep the original drives on the shelf and use another one for hacking but the drives started piling up after a while and I found other practical uses for them other than collecting dust. It just seemed silly to have a large drive sitting idle when I could have been using it for other purposes.
1. It's not necessary to keep an original drive from each TiVo, just 1 original drive from each type of TiVo.

2. The TiVo drives aren't very large. I have quite a few 70G, 160G, and 500G drives laying around because they are too small.

3. Although I have only had to use an original drive to resurrect a system once, I was very glad to have the original 160G drive when just prior to 9.4 I tried to upgrade the THD from 320G to 500G. The process failed. It's not unlikely I could have poked around and figured a way to get the process to work, but after attempting the 320G - 500G upgrade twice it only took a few minutes to start from scratch using the original 160G as the source, and it worked flawlessly.

jt1134
08-16-2008, 09:02 PM
That's the thing about backups. They are a pain in the butt, and a total waste of time and effort whenever they are not needed.

Agreed. I keep a hacked backup of ver 8.1.7 for my TivoHDs, retain the upgrade slices each time they come down, and have a simple script to initiate an upgrade and rehack. If I lose a drive, it should only take as long as restoring the backup and initiating the upgrade to the latest sw version. I try as hard as I can to keep from pulling the drive if unnecessary, hell, I've even BASH_ENV'd into my TivoHD once when I screwed something up. ;)

When I got my 2nd TivoHD I just restored the old backup, dbload'ed 9.3a slices, ran the script and went and ate dinner while it updated. 30 minutes later I had a new box at the (then) current sw with 140 HD hours and hacked just the way I like it, while only having to type about 3 commands.

lrhorer
08-16-2008, 09:22 PM
I can see the logic behind all the backing up and fail-safe procedures that everyone does. That's something I would do with data that I consider to be irreplaceable, like personal data on my PCs and laptops. But the Tivo software (and certainly the recordings) I think of as "transient" data - there's nothing unique about it and copies of it exist in any number of places.
That's not quite true. In fact, more generally it isn't true at all. First of all, like any computer the TiVo has basic configurations in place. The raw software does not. If one starts from scratch, one must redo one's wishlists, season passes, and of course the Thumbs-Up / Thumbs-Down list will take some time - typically several weeks - to be rebuilt. Not only that, but if it's a Series III with CableCards, it will require a call to the CATV company to get a hit sent to the cards. Depending on the density of the CSR one winds up getting on the phone and the local policies, one may be faced with the prospect of having to set up and wait for a service call from the CATV company. All of that is not trivial.

Speaking to the general case, most of the PCs with which I deal have no critical user data on them at all. All the important data is kept on the servers, both at work and at home. Backups are still important for client machines, because configuring a machine takes a lot of time. At work just this last week they replaced the machine I have on my desk. Unfortunately, the two (old and new) machines run Windows and are not hardware compatible as far as Windows... http://fletchergeek.com/images/puke.gif ...is concerned, so I spent the last week - up to 10 hours a day on top of my other duties - configuring the new machine. It won't be complete until next week. On the good side all the detritus accumulated over the last few years is of course gone, but it would have saved a ton of time if I could simply have transferred a backup image.


From a cost-benefit analysis perspective, it's "cheaper" for me to simply save the upgrade slices and to hack the drive in-place without extensive testing than it is to pull the drive, make a full virgin backup of each software version, test the new software and finally re-hack.
Well, I certainly would agree that is not necessary. I keep a the original hard drive from when the TiVo (or the same model, anyway) was purchased on the shelf so I can start from scratch if need be. When one or two upgrade versions have come down the pike, I re-install the drive and let the system upgrade it, then put it back on the shelf.

When an upgrade comes along, I go ahead and let the TiVo upgrade itself without interference. Once I am satisfied the software is stable - maybe 24 hours and a couple of reboots - I pull the drive and hack it, saving copies of every file I replace. Typically that's the kernel, tivoapp, and iptables, plus rc.sysinit.author if it exsts. The kernel gets saved to the hard drive of the hack machine. The rest just get renamed to tivoapp.sav, etc.


Anyway... to each his own. There's certainly nothing wrong with being overly cautious, but if you consider that this isn't exactly your tax return data or family photo albums we're dealing with here you can see how a little time savings over absolute data security might be worth it.
Employing a video server to hold all the "important" videos sidesteps the issue of needing to do a full system backup. It's the best of both worlds. The videos are stored on a fault-tolerant medium which gets regular automatic backups, full backup of the TiVo drive is not longer of much value, and there's no risk a bricked TiVo will lose the user's recordings no matter when or why the TiVo gets turned into a brick.


(Of course, if I had lgkahn's problem of 1 dead drive per year I might think about making an interim backup occasionally. I'll probably regret saying this but I have yet to experience a drive failure in all my years of Tivo ownership. Where do you keep your Tivos lgkahn? On a trampoline? ;))

Drive failures aren't the only issue in the mix. If a TiVo fails for reasons other than the hard drive, it's probably going to wind up being replaced. Unless one just bites the bullet and buys a new TiVo one's self, that means the drive is going to be sent back with the unit.

lrhorer
08-16-2008, 09:37 PM
I try as hard as I can to keep from pulling the drive if unnecessary
Well, I wouldn't take it to that extreme. One can be penny wise and pound foolish. What's more, by moving the primary hard drive into an external housing, pulling the hard drive now is a very simple and straightforward process - far less of a pain than pulling all the cables, getting the torx driver out, etc. In addition, the drive remains secure in a protected housing. Of course, dropping the housed drive onto a tile floor can still bork the drive, but with the shock mounting it's much less likely. Also, dropping something onto the housing is very unlikely to harm the drive inside, while dropping a screwdriver onto a bare drive can kill it, as can accidentally allowing a powered drive's electronics to come into contact with a metal object.

jt1134
08-16-2008, 09:49 PM
Well, I wouldn't take it to that extreme. One can be penny wise and pound foolish. What's more, by moving the primary hard drive into an external housing, pulling the hard drive now is a very simple and straightforward process - far less of a pain than pulling all the cables, getting the torx driver out, etc.

Well, my 2 year old can't knock the drive onto the floor if it's inside of the box (one of the several reasons I don't use an external drive). Bashing in with my laptop requires touching no cables, screwdrivers, external cases, or screws. But, to each his own <as this thread goes further and further off topic...>

For anyone with the foresight to install a serial adapter on an S3/HD and set their PROM password, this has been quite useful for me. I use it in /test.conf, use wherever will float your boat. Boot to the prom menu and set $bash as something (1, true, etc) and you'll get a bash prompt before any else happens.


insmod /platform/lib/modules/bcmtty_Gen06.o
stty 115200 sane < /dev/ttyS1
if [ $bash ]; then
setsid bash --login -i < /dev/ttyS1 >& /dev/ttyS1
fi
setsid bash --login -i < /dev/ttyS1 >& /dev/ttyS1 &

exit when you're done and a backgrounded bash session will be spawned as bootup continues :)

lgkahn
09-11-2008, 02:06 PM
I have serieal adapters on my hd tivos can you forward the link to instructions to set the prom password and where do i download the bcmtty module thanks

here are the modules that are currently in that directory

hdbrtivo:/platform/lib/modules$ ls bc*
bcm7038tty.o bcm7042.o bcm7411-D0.o bcmenet.o
hdbrtivo:/platform/lib/modules$

would the bcm7038tty.o module be ok to use instead?

Jamie
09-11-2008, 03:49 PM
I have serieal adapters on my hd tivos can you forward the link to instructions to set the prom password and where do i download the bcmtty module thanks

here are the modules that are currently in that directory

hdbrtivo:/platform/lib/modules$ ls bc*
bcm7038tty.o bcm7042.o bcm7411-D0.o bcmenet.o
hdbrtivo:/platform/lib/modules$

would the bcm7038tty.o module be ok to use instead?bcm7038tty.o is the correct module for the original Series3. bcmtty_Gen06.o is correct for the TiVoHD.

As far setting the prom password: link (http://www.dealdatabase.com/forum/showpost.php?p=236686&postcount=2).

phdeez
09-20-2008, 05:49 PM
Can someone tell me what I'm doing wrong?

I had the "beta" of 9.4, and applied jt1134's CSO (http://www.dealdatabase.com/forum/showpost.php?p=297642&postcount=4) and backdoor (http://www.dealdatabase.com/forum/showpost.php?p=297642&postcount=6) patches to my 9.4 image. CSO was disabled and backdoors showed "enabled". After the "official" rollout of 9.4 my system upgraded itself again :(. I had to re-hack it, but now it seems the copy protection hack isn't working. When the official 9.4 image came out, I simply copied over the patched image and rebooted. I checked that backdoors were enabled and they were. I tried to copy over something from HBO and it failed. So, I copied over the tivoapp.bak I made after the official 9.4 came; hex-edited it again in Notepad ++ (http://notepad-plus.sourceforge.net/uk/site.htm) and sent it back to the tivo. Rebooted, and again it shows backdoors enabled, but copy protection still isn't circumvented.

This holds true on digital channels [not analog, but not special channels ie HBO, SHO, etc] and HBO!

I can post a copy of the tivoapp I sent back to my tivo if it helps... System info shows "9.4.01-2-652"

jt1134
09-20-2008, 06:37 PM
My tivoapp is patched only for backdoors and NoCSO.


TiVo_HD#[/tvbin] $ md5sum tivoapp
808af4b8ea3ed471e9420c5af9c68801 tivoapp

TiVo_HD#[/tvbin] $ hexdump -C -s 1747028 -n 8 tivoapp
001aa854 10 00 00 aa 27 a4 00 28 |....'..(|
001aa85c
What does your tivoapp have to say?

phdeez
09-20-2008, 07:01 PM
Thx much for the quick response jt! Mine does report the same:


bash-2.02# cd /tvbin
bash-2.02# md5sum tivoapp
808af4b8ea3ed471e9420c5af9c68801 tivoapp
bash-2.02# hexdump -C -s 1747028 -n 8 tivoapp
001aa854 10 00 00 aa 27 a4 00 28 |....'..(|
001aa85c
bash-2.02#

Looks the same, no? I checked "protection" status via https://tivoip/nowplaying/index.html

and it reports "protected" while other items allow download via "Download MPEG-PS"

jt1134
09-20-2008, 07:07 PM
oh, ok. The values of the CSO and CCI byte are 2 different things. Knocking out a CSO value doesn't mean that the TTG protocol will ignore the CCI byte. Extraction using the mfs_* utils (tytool, mfs_ftp, vserver+mfs_uberexport) should work fine, but things that use TTG, like TivoDesktop won't.

I'm curious (since none of my channels are flagged at all), could you dump the info for a show whose CCI byte is set and post it here?
NowShowing | grep "Showname" will show you the FSID of the protected show.
mfs_dumpobj -r "FSID" > show.txt will dump the metadata to a file.

thanks.

phdeez
09-20-2008, 07:17 PM
AHHHHH so, I'm just being a dumbass! My bad... let me get mfs_tools handled and I'll post back...

/edit/ With requested files... show.txt is from HBO-HD; show1.txt is from Nicktoons (i think...)

jt1134
09-20-2008, 08:06 PM
RecordingDrm 933560/11 {
SignatureType[16]=1
CopyProtectionInfo[18]=100 50344978 2073756160 -483896316 1409286144 16777216 805306368 134217728 67108864 50331648 134217728 0 1448009494 134217728 251658240 488185315 134217728 251658240 -943047220 256 -183498752 458687801 65674 524288 -485556224 1906973
Signature[17]=20 2026736715 -477087064 -747563087 1523192073 497515303
}
this is most likely the problem. was the Nicktoons show protected also?

If you are looking at recordings made since v8.x, CSO values are no longer used. Instead, there are values such as SignatureType, MediaEncryptionKeyType, and MediaSigningKeyType. The "NoCSO" hack sets these values to zero, just as is in the past it set the CSO values to zero. Jamie posted drmcheck.tcl here (http://dealdatabase.com/forum/showpost.php?p=288922&postcount=802) a while back, demonstrating this.

phdeez
09-20-2008, 08:15 PM
Yes it was... would you like me to post a non CCI file? <Just wanted to show an HD and SD show...>

jt1134
09-20-2008, 08:17 PM
No, I was already looking at my files with a null CCI byte, the main difference I saw was the CopyProtectionInfo values. I was just curious.

jt1134
10-18-2008, 08:17 PM
9.4(.1?) source has been posted.

http://www.tivo.com/linux/

not too much difference from 9.3. just looks like a bunch of debug stuff + built-in usb modules as discussed earlier.

jt1134
11-13-2008, 01:29 AM
I just got a new TivoHD today and it downloaded 9.4b-01-2-652 after a few service calls. Haven't prom hacked it yet, so I can't tell what differences there may be (other than maybe going thru the menus, but who does that anymore?) Anyone else received it yet?