PDA

View Full Version : Tips of the Trade



Glitched
01-14-2002, 01:15 PM
I use bash prompt very frequently, I find it the easiest way to transfer files to and from the tivo. 2 things that i have noticed that may help out those "new" to this kind of thing. file transfer is slow.... and when using joe to edit files, lines seem to get misplaced... SO here is how to fix these....

I only use teraterm pro, so all examples will be from it..

1. transfering files is slow...
The way to fix this is to type "stty 115200" at your bash prompt, then your bash prompt will go away, you will then need to go to your teraterm setup and change the serial port setup to 115200 (instead of 9600), you can now transfer files at about 12 times the original speed. You canmake this change permenant by adding the above command to .bashrc (should be in the root dir of your xtreme image ;), yes its there i promise) and note you will most likely have to reset your terminal to this every time.

2. Joe gives you some "extra line weird thing"(technical term) when editing files from bash...
The way to fix this is to goto teraterm setup, then to terminal settings and change the terminal size to 80x25, instead of the 80x24 that is set there by default. once again this will most likely have to be changed again each time teraterm is opened and closed...

Hope this helped.. i know it help me.. :D

genericuser
01-14-2002, 02:25 PM
Depending on your serial cable, you may find that 57,600 is the fastest you want to go. I found that 115200 was causing zmodem to freak out so it would take longer then just using 57600.

Of course my serial cable is 40 feet long.

bato
01-14-2002, 03:15 PM
I beleive you can save TTPRO setup, you only have to put the same name as the initial .ini in the directory where you execute TeraTerm.

Glitched
01-14-2002, 03:38 PM
good call bato... :rolleyes: never saw the "save setup".. i always was one to miss the obvious things

chipster
01-15-2002, 12:48 AM
If you get bash via a telnet session and want to xfer files, rz/sz is hit & miss. Zmodem doesn't really like TCP/IP.

Instead, get the FTP daemon for TiVo to transfer files.

http://pvrhack.sonnik.com/tivo/dl_info.asp?DLID=39

chipster
01-15-2002, 11:25 AM
Based on a tip from AVSForum, I got some of these flat fan units. I placed my DTivo on top of it, and lowered the temp 8C.

No messing with drilling holes or upgrading the internal fan.

They're pretty kewl...

http://store.yahoo.com/zerus/notebookcooler.html

I am not connected in any way with the seller. Just a neat product that alleviates a concern of many...

smeghead
01-16-2002, 02:34 AM
I don't claim this trick is highly original or advanced, but it's saved my butt on more than one occasion so I figured I'd post it...

When hacking around on tivo it can be a little too easy to end up with an unbootable box - especially when making changes to rc.sysinit. It gets a bit stale pulling out the torx driver after a while ;), so here's a way to give yourself a safety.

Pick a dummy file to use, e.g. /var/hack/foo

Edit the rc.sysinit file, but enclose your changes in a conditional block as follows:

if [ -e /var/hack/foo ]; then
rm -f /var/hack/foo
# put your test code here
else
# put the original code here if applicable
fi

Then, to test your new changes, do
touch /var/hack/foo
sync
reboot

If all goes well, you can remove the conditional bit. If not and your TiVo won't boot, simply remove and reapply power and the next time it starts up it will skip the new block and boot as normal, allowing you to figure out what's wrong.

Hope this is useful to somebody.

dertb
01-18-2002, 04:54 PM
[i]

if [ -e /var/hack/foo ]; then
rm -f /var/hack/foo
# put your test code here
else
# put the original code here if applicable
fi

[/B]
For some reason it is not deleting my foo file. I dont think that it is excuting in the sysinit file. I created a tcl script and it runs fine from a bash promt. Any ideas why it wont execute from the rc.sysinit? Does it make a difference where it is placed in the file?

thanks

dertb

jackass_llama
01-19-2002, 01:03 AM
Concerned about heat?
Based on a tip from AVSForum, I got some of these flat fan units. I placed my DTivo on top of it, and lowered the temp 8C.

No messing with drilling holes or upgrading the internal fan.

They're pretty kewl...

http://store.yahoo.com/zerus/notebookcooler.html

I am not connected in any way with the seller. Just a neat product that alleviates a concern of many...



I'm thinking about buying one of these. Does anyone have any experiences with them? Are they worthwhile? Do they generate a lot of noise?

chinhster
01-22-2002, 12:25 PM
if [ -e /var/hack/foo ]; then
rm -f /var/hack/foo
# put your test code here
else
# put the original code here if applicable
fi


This is an excellent tip but to expand on it a bit, how about

if [ -e /var/hack/foo ]; then
# put the original code here if applicable
else
touch /var/hack/foo
# put your test code here
rm -f /var/hack/foo
fi

This requires less interaction from you and if your test code fails,
it'll run your original code instead after you reboot.

-Chinhster

chipster
01-23-2002, 11:53 PM
Originally posted by jackass_llama



I'm thinking about buying one of these. Does anyone have any experiences with them? Are they worthwhile? Do they generate a lot of noise?

Very quiet. Probably not quiet enough for the bedroom, but fine in any other room. 8C temp difference - as reported by the Tivo.

AlphaWolf
03-05-2002, 03:00 AM
I think this tip should be worthwhile, as it helped all 4 of my tivos boot faster, (on one by 3 minutes, 10 seconds on the least tweaked one, not much, but its a start) and I am sure it will help many others.

Add a 'sleep 300' in rc.sysinit right before executing any of the hack scripts you might use, saves overhead during the initial bootup, and will allow the 'acquiring satellite information' part to finnish faster.

rd001
06-19-2002, 01:01 PM
Using my dual-tuner-enabled DSR6000 and Turbonet, I extract video using jdiner's excellent TyTool4. I run very few other mods except noscramble and no continuous scripts.

I've found that I get 1.1MB per second transfers normally with my 100baseT network card and using a crossover cable.

However, if I just put the DSR6000 into Standby mode, I get 1.35MB per second transfers.

A sweet 22% speed increase. And you don't need to learn TCL to get it to work.

I would guess that the dual-tuner recording and live TV display takes extra time on the system bus. It also seems to get even slower than 1.1MB if you park the system on an animated system menu while extracting.

P.S. After more research, I've found that Standby mode is not always such a speed boost. It also seems to depend on whether you're running dual-tuners and where the DTivo is storing the material on its hard drive and how full the DTivo hard drive is.

AlphaWolf
08-30-2002, 12:08 PM
To minimize audio/video skipping, (nay, probably eliminate it completely, and even possibly eliminate unexpected rebooting), you should run ALL of your hacks at the lowest priority.

Embeem has pointed out to me that nice does nothing for prioritizing your tivo. Instead use setpri, which you can download here (http://tivo.samba.org/download/mbm/bin/setpri) .

Copy setpri into your /bin directory, chmod +x it, and in your rc.sysinit, add this line before the line to call bash:

setpri fifo 1 $$

Not only will this do what I mentioned above, but it could also speed up the boot time, and make your tivo pay more attention to what your keying in on your remote instead of worrying about the next transaction that some script you are looping wants to execute. This will not break any of your hacks' ability to perform their function. This works great if you run nosdd, tivotitle, or mvchannels regularly.

finster869
09-14-2002, 12:08 PM
Alphawolf:

Would you place the setpri fifo 1 $$ at the very beginning of the rc.sysinit file? If I have an rc.sysinit.author file, can I put it in there instead? (I hate editing rc.sysinit).

groundhog
09-18-2002, 03:33 PM
Concerned about heat?
Based on a tip from AVSForum, I got some of these flat fan units. I placed my DTivo on top of it, and lowered the temp 8C.

No messing with drilling holes or upgrading the internal fan.

They're pretty kewl...

http://store.yahoo.com/zerus/notebookcooler.html

I found a cheap and effective alternate solution to this. I have my Direct TV Tivo(DSR6K) in a Entertainment Center with an open front(no glass). I bought the biggest/cheapest computer fan at an electronics store. I think that it was 4" x 4". I tye wrapped it to the back of the entertainment center, just above where the cables come into it. I forces air onto the back of my Tivo, and under it. I used an adjustable DC power adapter to power it. Set at 12 volts it was way too loud. I turned it down to around 6 (or 7.5) volts, and it's pretty quite(just a little louder than the hard drives). Lowered my temp by over 12 degrees C! Also, the cool thing about the adjustable voltage is that you can set it higher when you leave the house & cool it by an additional few degrees C.. The fan cost $5 & the power supply cost $3(@ Harbor Freight).

deadc0ed
10-29-2002, 01:16 PM
Just a heads up. I bought one of these notebook coolers serveral months ago and it dropped my DTivo (/w 120G 7200 rpm drive) temp about 6 degrees. However one of the 3 fans burned out within two weeks (running 24hrs a day) and one of the remaining fans began to make a horrible noise, so loud I turned the thing off and trashed it. Your milage may vary.

superzap
11-25-2002, 07:09 PM
These are the standard instructions:
1) rz send the upgrade.tar.gz archive to your tivo / (root) directory
2) rm -rf /var/hack
3) rm /bin/joe /bin/joerc
4) gzip -d upgrade.tar.gz
5) cpio -i -H tar -d -F upgrade.tar

!!!NOTE!!
If you see that any file did not get overwritten, manually delete
the file or files and do step 5 again

6) /tvbin/reboot
7) mount -o remount,rw /
8) /tvbin/noppv.tcl dump
9) sync
10) mount -o remount,ro /

Tip: add the u option and you won't have to repeat step 5 as noted:
5) cpio -iu -H tar -d -F upgrade.tar

I also tested installing while the drive is in pc:
1) copy upgrade.tar.gz to your C: drive root directory then boot linux from CD or floppy.
2) enter commands:
mkdir /td
mount /dev/hdXY /td
(where X= "b" if Primary Slave, "c" if Secondary Master, "d" if Secondary Slave and Y=number of your root partition, 4 or 7, use dd if=/dev/hdX bs=18 count=1 to find out if you don't know)
mkdir /dos
mount /dev/hda1 /dos
cd /td
tar -xzf /dos/upgrade.tar.gz

(The above steps replace steps 4 and 5 of standard instructions)

dain_bramaged
01-23-2003, 11:41 AM
deadc0ed and i must have gotten units from the same run.

i had to disconnect one fan after a month and now a second one is doing a noisy death march. headed for the trash any day now.

i'm in a warm climate and at best it lowered unit 4 degrees.

might be a good product for short interval use but i'd recommend finding another cooling process.

snj2000
01-28-2003, 07:30 PM
That notebook cooler seemed like an inexpensive no hassel cooling option, but from the sounds of it, they may not last very long.

Just wondering, how did you power it? The ones I looked at are powered via USB, but I don't have USB near my TIVO???

Thanks...

donbadabon
01-29-2003, 06:55 AM
I had the notebook cooler, and it was powered by an A/C outlet.
Mine lasted about 5 months before one of the fans died, and then the others started making grinding and screaching noises.
Unless they've changed something in their design, I would not recommend getting one.

m5runner
01-29-2003, 05:20 PM
your tivo has 2 USB ports on the back. take a look and see. by the way, what did u guys expect for 20 bucks?? it was fun while it lasted.


///M5

Murdock
03-26-2003, 05:07 PM
I tried one of those notebook coolers too but also decided to get rid of it due to excessive noise. Then I read on the Tivo community forum about the Thermaltake TT-6025A 60 mm case fan, if used as a replacement for the stock internal fan it lowers your temperature by 8 C to 14 C. It says on the box 21 CFM but this is a misprint, it is actually 31 CFM, it comes with a 3 pin connector and includes a 3 to 4 pin adapter. First I tried it at 12V using the 3 to 4 pin adapter and it lowered my Tivo's temperature by 14 C but was a bit loud. Tried it at 7V using the fan power connector from the original fan and it ran 8 C cooler than with the original fan and was not noticeably louder at all.

BubbleLamp
03-26-2003, 06:18 PM
Originally posted by Murdock
I tried one of those notebook coolers too but also decided to get rid of it due to excessive noise. Then I read on the Tivo community forum about the Thermaltake TT-6025A 60 mm case fan, if used as a replacement for the stock internal fan it lowers your temperature by 8 C to 14 C. It says on the box 21 CFM but this is a misprint, it is actually 31 CFM, it comes with a 3 pin connector and includes a 3 to 4 pin adapter. First I tried it at 12V using the 3 to 4 pin adapter and it lowered my Tivo's temperature by 14 C but was a bit loud. Tried it at 7V using the fan power connector from the original fan and it ran 8 C cooler than with the original fan and was not noticeably louder at all.

I tried the Thermaltake, too whiny for me, even at 7V. I now have a Vantec that is absolutely the quietest. I have no thermal issues either, but my Tivo's are in the open air, not in a cabinet.

khomer13
04-30-2003, 04:24 PM
Bubblelamp...
Can you tell me the model # of the Vantec fan? Also, where i can order/find them at? Do they fit a Sony Sat60 dtivo? Thanx....

BubbleLamp
05-02-2003, 02:10 AM
Originally posted by khomer13
Bubblelamp...
Can you tell me the model # of the Vantec fan? Also, where i can order/find them at? Do they fit a Sony Sat60 dtivo? Thanx....

I got my fan off eBay. It's a model # SF6025L. Like I said, the dimensions are correct, but you will need new corner screws to hold it in. (I haven't confirmed it yet, but I think they are 6-32 threads.) Yes, AFAIO the Sony has the same internals.

FredThompson
09-14-2003, 11:50 PM
@ khomer13, there are different types of fans from Vantec. You will probably want the Stealth or Thermoflow.

albcool
03-08-2004, 02:51 PM
I just noticed that the early Philips Pronto serial cable looks identical to the serial cables we are making for the Tivo. Has anyone tried one yet? Just curious.

:)
Yes thats what use

cojonesdetoro
03-08-2004, 05:18 PM
It's nice to keep a bash command history between logins. In order for this to happen your ${HOME}/.bash_history file needs to be writable.

There are two things you can do:

1) If your $HOME dir is / then do:

mv .bash_history /var
ln -s /var/.bash_history /.bash_history

2) or put this in your /.bashrc file:

HOME=/var/hack ; export HOME

You will then need the same .bashrc file /var/hack
EDIT: You will then need the same .bashrc file in /var/hack

Both methods will make it so command history is saved when you log out and back in. I prefer method #2

captain_video
04-06-2004, 04:08 PM
This is an old guide but the link to it is no longer valid so I'm reposting it here for the benefit of all you newbies. It contains a lot of basic Linux commands and other pertinent info that should help get you started with hacking your new Tivo. Enjoy!

cojonesdetoro
04-14-2004, 06:07 PM
This link is to a new post but I guess a sticky is a good place for this tip in the long term:

http://www.dealdatabase.com/forum/showthread.php?t=34115

This works on SA1/3.0 but is braindead enough to work all platforms.

cojonesdetoro
05-13-2004, 11:49 PM
I store the script below in /var/hack/bin/p. I can quickly see if processes are running by typing "p {some part of process name}"... like "p http" to see if tivoweb is running or "p ftp" if I'm looking for mfs_ftp.

EDIT: "p" by itself shows the process table... I find it handier than typing the whole ps grep thing.



#!/bin/sh
ps auxww | grep -v grep | grep "$*" | grep -v $0

drnull
05-14-2004, 10:47 AM
#!/bin/sh
ps auxww | grep -v grep | grep "$*" | grep -v $0


I've always been fond of the f switch in ps, to give you a tree view of the processes. Can be added to your statement with no ill effect. Thanks for showing the ww switches, too, nice to know how to expand the line to see all the args, etc.

While I'm here I guess I'll post something I found recently that is very helpful when trying to follow the branches in asm code. In vi, * (and #) look for the next (and previous) occurrence of the word under the cursor. Great for putting the cursor over an address and finding where it jumps to or what jumps to it. I got sick of typing "/0x00...." every time I was searching. Oh, and '' (two single quotes) will take you back to the previous position. m followed by a letter will mark a position, and ' (single quote) followed by that letter will take you back there.

Take it or leave it. I guess some people use ida, so this doesn't apply. I'm not fond of ida, because it didn't put string references in right.

cojonesdetoro
05-31-2004, 12:42 AM
This version will list your processes and the priority. As the previous example works, it will take an argument. For example "p mfs" will show all processes with "mfs" in the process table entry.

Use this to make sure your hacks are running at "fifo 1" priority. Most all hacks should run at this speed so as to avoid slowing down 'real' Tivo functions. Check this out if you get video anamolies or interface sluggishness.



#!/tvbin/tivosh
set f [ open "|ps auxww" ]
puts [ gets $f ]
while { [eof $f] == 0 } {
set LINE [ gets $f ]
if { [ string first "$argv" "$LINE" ] != -1 } {
catch { puts " $LINE GPRI: [ getpri [ lindex $LINE 1 ] ] " }
}
}
close $f

EDIT: This will work if the 'ps' binary is in your $PATH. It seems to work well with my PS binary on my SA1/3.0

EDIT2: Unlike the one above, this version will also show itself in the output. It doesn't bother me but if you want it not shown then make it ignore lines that match $argv0 as well

cojonesdetoro
10-25-2004, 06:21 PM
I use the Tivo message feature a lot (weather, output of the TW infor module, errors, etc). The messages tend to pile up so I wrote this little script to delete mail messages by strings existing in the subject field:

example: delete all messages with the word 'weather' in the subject (case sensitive)


delmsg.tcl weather

Be careful how it is used(at your own risk, btw)



#!/tvbin/tivosh
set db [ dbopen ]

ForeachMfsFile fsid name type "/MessageItem/MessageBoard" "" {
RetryTransaction {
set msg [db $db openid $fsid]
set subject [dbobj $msg get Subject]
set deleted [dbobj $msg get Deleted]
if { $deleted != 1 } {
if { [ string first "$argv" "$subject" ] != -1 } {
puts "Found Mail with Subject: $subject"
puts "Deleting...."
dbobj $msg set Deleted 1
event send $TmkEvent::EVT_DATA_CHANGED $TmkDataChanged::MESSAGES 0
}
}
}
}

EDIT: BTW if you delete something by mistake then quickly change the '1' in these lines to a '0' and run again

if { $deleted != 1 } {
dbobj $msg set Deleted 1

AlphaWolf
10-31-2004, 08:02 PM
Heres a set of startup scripts that I have made which I thought I would share. They optimize the bootup speed and give you a telnet session as soon as you possibly can get one (very quickly I might add, it comes before the first splash.)

These startup scripts can work on all 3.x and up software versions and assume the all in one set is installed on your tivo in /tivo-bin. These scripts also provide a good recovery method for those who like to live on the bleeding edge of tivo hacks, saving you from having to remove the hard drive from your tivo in order to fix certain things.

Note that these are sample scripts and are a *tad* bit configured for my specific setup. I have annotated them to give some good hints on what you can do with them and why they are configured the way that they are.

FWIW, using this tar I have somewhat reduced the steps for an upgrade:
1) load slices, faking loopsets if necessary
2) modify the installsw.itcl to not reboot and run it
3) mount alt root, put the tar files for startup scripts and all in one set in the root dir of the alt root
4) dd killhdinitrd'd kernel to both /dev/hda3 and /dev/hda6
5) chroot to the alt root
6) cpio -i -H tar < configscripts.tar; mkdir /tivo-bin; mv tivotools.tar /tivo-bin; cd tivo-bin; cpio -i -H tar < tivotools.tar
7) in 4.x/5.x setups only: mv /etc/netfilter-disable /etc/netfilter-enable (kills the firewall)
8) reboot and enjoy the upgrade :D

YMMV

(note the attachment is just a tar file, had to rename it to .tgz)

slider565
12-01-2004, 03:42 PM
If you have serial bash access and your tivo is continually rebooting because of something you tried to change, like, oh, :rolleyes: I don't know, load some kernel modules from the wrong kernel version, there's enough time during the boot cycle to put in some commands to move your original modules back. Create a text file on your PC that has the right commands in it, like:
mount -o rw,remount /
mv /lib/modules /lib/modules.hacked
mv /lib/modules.orig /lib/modules
or whatever you need to revert back to stock files. In your serial bash shell, hit return during the boot (right around where it says "starting services" is a good time), then paste your code (make sure there's a return at the end), and on the next reboot cycle, you're saved! This simple trick saved me from having to pull my drive today after doing something stupid - you guessed it ;)

goony
02-14-2005, 10:35 PM
When hacking TiVo drives with your PC and your favorite Linux-based utility disk, you might be running something that takes a long time (like copying drives or cloning using 'dd' or 'mfstool'). You are still curious how long the operation takes, but don't want to sit around and watch for the finish.

Simply use the Linux/Unix feature of multiple commands per line:

date; your usual command goes here; date<enter>

Thus, you get a printout of the date immediately before your command and immediately afterwards and eliminates your need to be there at the finish to observe how long it took - now you can start it and leave it!

You can enter the blue command as an experiment to see what I mean:
$ date; sleep 10; date
Mon Feb 14 22:32:07 EST 2005
Mon Feb 14 22:32:17 EST 2005
$I used this last night (before going to bed) to see how long it took to clone an entire 120GB DirecTivo drive and started it. Result: 1hr 30mins using 'dd' utility and a blocksize of 1024k. (1.6Ghz AMD, 512MB memory, both drives on UDMA100 controller).

goony
02-19-2005, 03:06 AM
To see what is going on "live" as-it-is-happening in a logfile, you can use the "-f" option with the "tail" command... and you can interrupt it with ^C (control-C).

Example:

/var/log$ tail -f tvlog
Feb 19 07:59:26 (none) HandleDataChangedAction[195]: Sleeping while UI is active
Feb 19 07:59:49 (none) Recorder[193]: Allocate rec 1277122
Feb 19 07:59:49 (none) Recorder[193]: Allocating new recording file. Size 26624
Feb 19 07:59:49 (none) Recorder[193]: Live cache size 262144
Feb 19 07:59:49 (none) Recorder[193]: Live cache size 262144
Feb 19 07:59:49 (none) Recorder[193]: Recording Id 1277122 size 0
Feb 19 07:59:49 (none) Recorder[193]: User recording 103934196 free 782452
Feb 19 07:59:49 (none) Recorder[193]: TivoClip total 11102987 free 284427
Feb 19 07:59:49 (none) Recorder[193]: Allocated stream Id 1277181, size 26624
Feb 19 07:59:49 (none) Recorder[193]: Stream allocated and linked in tmp
Feb 19 07:59:49 (none) Recorder[193]: Computed encryption stuff
Feb 19 07:59:49 (none) Recorder[193]: Stream added to recording
Feb 19 07:59:49 (none) Recorder[193]: Stream unlinked from tmp
Feb 19 07:59:49 (none) Recorder[193]: Allocate success! Adding START task
Feb 19 07:59:49 (none) Recorder[193]: Adding check schedule task
^C
/var/log$

nomailforjeff
02-20-2005, 09:50 PM
I like to replace the torx screws with standard phillips screws the first time I upgrade a box. It seems like I can never find my T10 or T15 when something goes wrong and I'm in a hurry... :mad:

eastwind
03-02-2005, 05:26 PM
When hacking TiVo drives with your PC and your favorite Linux-based utility disk, you might be running something that takes a long time (like copying drives or cloning using 'dd' or 'mfstool'). You are still curious how long the operation takes, but don't want to sit around and watch for the finish.

Simply use the Linux/Unix feature of multiple commands per line:

date; your usual command goes here; date<enter>

Thus, you get a printout of the date immediately before your command and immediately afterwards and eliminates your need to be there at the finish to observe how long it took - now you can start it and leave it!

You can enter the blue command as an experiment to see what I mean:
$ date; sleep 10; date
Mon Feb 14 22:32:07 EST 2005
Mon Feb 14 22:32:17 EST 2005
$I used this last night (before going to bed) to see how long it took to clone an entire 120GB DirecTivo drive and started it. Result: 1hr 30mins using 'dd' utility and a blocksize of 1024k. (1.6Ghz AMD, 512MB memory, both drives on UDMA100 controller).
Or you could use the 'time' function.
[bash DTiVo(4): ~] $time dd if=/dev/hda7 of=/dev/null
262144+0 records in
262144+0 records out

real 1m11.416s
user 0m3.610s
sys 0m21.130s
[bash DTiVo(4): ~] $

ew

sparx
03-18-2005, 12:20 AM
When doing lots of experimenting with hacks it can be a pain to mount the drive back in the bracket and reinstall the bracket. Its also bad to leave the drive loose in case it vibrates into contact with the power supply. While testing changes I put some double-sided foam sticky tape under the drive to hold it in place. The foam also reduces the noise from the drive being coupled through the Tivo frame to the entertainment center. When I finish making changes (if I finish?) I'll probably try to isolate the drive from the bracket with something similar to keep the noise down.

eastwind
03-21-2005, 12:51 PM
When I'm experimenting I tend to work in both boot/root sets, so I wrote a couple of scripts named boot4.sh and boot7.sh to keep the typos at bay when switching. This is boot7.sh (obviously):
#!/bin/bash
bootpage -A 3 /dev/hda
bootpage -B 6 /dev/hda
bootpage -P "root=/dev/hda7 dsscon=true console=2,115200 upgradesoftware=false" /dev/hda
restartI also include in my hostname command a clue as to which root partition I'm using:
/devbin/hostname " DTiVo(7)" and put that in the prompt:
export PS1='[\s\[\033[1;31m\]\h: \w\[\033[0m\]] $'
It's not obvious why any of this is necessary until you start switching back and forth (between software versions or kernels--for me it was a standard kernel and a s2_unscramble kernel) and pop a couple of typos in.

ew

Ovit1
11-10-2005, 10:42 PM
Based on a tip from AVSForum, I got some of these flat fan units. I placed my DTivo on top of it, and lowered the temp 8C.

No messing with drilling holes or upgrading the internal fan.

They're pretty kewl...

http://store.yahoo.com/zerus/notebookcooler.html

I am not connected in any way with the seller. Just a neat product that alleviates a concern of many...

I have two hard drives in my DirecTivo and installed some computer fans in the top case. I used a pigtail jumper to connect the fans to the hard drive jumper. Just watch out for physical interferrence from internal components when locating your fans in the case. See the attached pictures.

Jetstream
08-20-2006, 05:53 PM
Captain Video, I want to thank you very much. I have been reading all of the threads I could find for days and yours is the first one that actually has information I can use.

Specifically, HOW TO START!

I hacked my HR10-250 and haven't been able to do anything with it past that.

Why? Because everything I've found so far tells you what to do, but not how to do it.

1. Install mfs_ftp into your Tivo. HOW?
2. Go to this directory and unzip this file. HOW?
And so and so on...

I've read all the guides and they do have some information, but I want to start!

Thanks to your post I may be able to do just that.

The fine print reads like this:

This post is not a knock on all those who are far beyond the need for the basics, I will be following in your footsteps.

Politica
11-02-2009, 12:22 PM
How do I increase the speed of my Telnet throughput? (like I'm a 10 year old)

I have a Tivo Series 1, with an ethernet card installed. I can Telnet to it just fine, using application called Staff-FTP. These are the instructions I followed (Read my question after these steps.):


ON THE PC, I:
1. I Clicked on "Start" icon
2. I Picked "Run"
3. In the "Run" dialog box, typd "cmd" (without quotes) and hit <enter>
4. In the new window, type "Telnet 192.168.1.131" <enter>
(or whatever the IP address is for your Tivo)
You should then see a brief message saying "connecting to 192.168 ..."
Then the prompt: "Tivo >" (I think that is the prompt I set up)
5. Type "psftp" <enter>
You should get back a single line with "grep ftp" at the end
6. Type "mfs" <enter>
This will start the mfs_ftp program on the Tivo
7. Type "psftp" <enter>
This time you should get two lines back. The new one has
"tivosh var/mfs_ftp ..." at the end
8. Type "Exit" <enter>
You should now be out of the Tivo and back to your PC's CMD
window. Close the window
9. Take a breath !

Back in Windows XP:
10. Setup up the folder you want to use to hold your Tivo files.
11. Start up your FTP program (CuteFTP ?)
12. Set the "Local" folder to the one you want to use on your PC
(see step 10)
13. Set up the connection to the "remote" computer (i.e. the Tivo):
Host is: 192.168.1.131 (or whatever)
Port is: 3105 (very important)

Many FTP programs allow you to check a box for "anonymous" logins
If yours doesn't, use:
Login is: anonymous
Password is: "user@anonymous.com"

14. Have your FTP program connect to the Tivo.
Sometimes it takes a couple of tries.
15. Once the connection is made, change the remote (i.e. Tivo)
directory to "\tmf"
16. Start tranferring file(s).
17. When you are finished with your transfers, simply have the FTP
program on you PC disconnect from the Tivo and close the PC
program.

The problem arose when I started transfering. The transfer rate is about 22kb/sec!! At that rate, it would take me over 86 hours to transfer a 3 hour football game! Can anyone tell me why this is so slow and what I can do to increase the transfer rate????

:(

jeanlee411
04-25-2010, 02:56 PM
Very quiet. Probably not quiet enough for the bedroom, but fine in any other room. 8C temp difference - as reported by the Tivo.

I think this tip should be worthwhile, as it helped all 4 of my tivos boot faster, (on one by 3 minutes, 10 seconds on the least tweaked one, not much, but its a start) and I am sure it will help many others.

Add a 'sleep 300' in rc.sysinit right before executing any of the hack scripts you might use, saves overhead during the initial bootup, and will allow the 'acquiring satellite information' part to finnish faster.

cojonesdetoro
04-26-2010, 09:19 AM
Actually, it's a good idea to run all hack scripts in rc file as a background process with a delay like below. running in background let's the rc process finish. If one of your scripts hangs while running in foreground, it might prevent you from telnetting in. The delay also let's you have time to telnet in and fix something if one of your scripts goes horribly wrong and makes the box unreachable as soon as it runs.


(
sleep 300

<- hack script commands here

)&


The way I do it is I put all my scripts in /etc/rc.hacks and run that from the main rc scipt as a background process:

/etc/rc.hacks &

The rc.hacks file looks like above witth the initial 300 sec. delay but no parens. If something causes a reboot loop I can telnet in quickly during the 300 second window and rename /etc/rc.hacks to something else so it's no longer in the boot sequence. Then I can run it manually to see where it's screwing up. Once I fix the problem I rename it back so it runs at boot.

unitron
05-02-2011, 12:26 AM
I like to replace the torx screws with standard phillips screws the first time I upgrade a box. It seems like I can never find my T10 or T15 when something goes wrong and I'm in a hurry... :mad:

Good idea, but I'm starting to think I'd be better off with thumbscrews or velcro or a zipper.:)

rrohanwague
01-02-2012, 05:01 PM
My HR10-250 has been hacked and i was wondering.Because everything I've found so far tells you what to do, but not how to do it.

1. Install mfs_ftp into your Tivo.

2. Go to this directory and unzip this file.
And so and so on...I've read all the guides and they do have some information, but I want to start

Thanks to your post I may be able to do just that.