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Thread: Tivo and the Xbox

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    32

    xbmc

    hello,

    with the newest builds of XBMC there you can stream from pc and or tivo. also it has a built in dvd player.

    any q's

    Myk3

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    16
    how do you stream directly from Tivo?

    Instuctions please..

    Thanks..
    Chuck

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    32

    very easy

    first what version on xbmc are u running?

    the newsest version at least the last 10 or so. just enable file sharing on the pc, then go to "my videos" and then go to workgroup / smb share
    and it show the workgroup that the pc and the xbox is on and just pick the object to play

    Myk3

  4. #19
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    Jan 2006
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    16
    I play things off my pc no problem with my xbox, but i can just browse out to my tivo and play shows off it?

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Narnia
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    1,263
    Quote Originally Posted by dishdude
    I play things off my pc no problem with my xbox, but i can just browse out to my tivo and play shows off it?

    You need to hack your tivo, and run ccxstream (or ccxstream_S2 for series-2 units). Then make a bookmark in XBMC to your tivo, port 1400. Instructions should be included with the ccxstream program(s).

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    32

    ccxstream

    ok,

    first need a hacked tivo and xbox. then need to install and run ccxstream on ur tivo. add it to the rc.sysinit file to start it at boot. then in xbmc add the following line in the my videos section of the Xboxmediacenter.xml

    <bookmark>
    <name>Tivo shows</name>
    <path>xbms://192.168.0.100:1400/</path>
    </bookmark>


    the TIVO SHOWS can be whatever you want to call it.
    this will add a link under "my videos" that says "tivo shows" or whatever

    Myk3
    Last edited by mchipser; 03-26-2006 at 06:51 PM.

  7. #22
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    Jan 2006
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    16
    Worked like a champ... CCXStream was already there so just needed that bookmark.. Thanks!!!

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    32

    no problem

    hey if you need anything else just post something

    Myk3

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    295
    Quote Originally Posted by mchipser
    hey if you need anything else just post something

    Myk3
    Is there anything special about HD content that CCXStream can't handle (DD5.1 audio, for example)? I'm interested in this for content recorded on my HR10-250 and was wondering if there's anything different about it that would prevent it from working (I haven't tried this, just wondering if there are any known issues before I do).

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Gurnee, IL
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    2,384
    The Xbox simply doesn't have the horsepower to play HD content effectively. I've tried it with HD Divx stuff as well...stutter/skip.
    --
    Christopher D. Heer
    Quote Originally Posted by Oscar Wilde
    Perhaps, after all, America never has been discovered. I myself would say that it had merely been detected.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    295
    Is it the software? Or does the network overhead do it in?

    I mean, the XBOX handles HD game output fine, what is it about HD content that slows it down? Isn't part of the point of streaming content so that the client can buffer as needed to help with playback?

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    41
    Quote Originally Posted by SpoonsJTD
    Is it the software? Or does the network overhead do it in?
    Its the xbox cpu - well, at least for the original xbox, not sure about xbox 360, but I don't think XBMC has been ported to it yet. As a test, I downloaded a couple HD movie trailers, and played them both streamed from my PC, and played back directly from the xbox hard drive. In both scenarios, the 720p trailer played back perfectly, not a single dropped frame; the 1080 trailer played back with 1/2 - 3/4 of the frames dropped - poor little CPU just can't keep up with the overhead of decompressing that much data.

    Quote Originally Posted by SpoonsJTD
    I mean, the XBOX handles HD game output fine, what is it about HD content that slows it down? Isn't part of the point of streaming content so that the client can buffer as needed to help with playback?
    If you had an uncompressed video source to play back, it might work just fine - its the decompression that kills it.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    295
    Quote Originally Posted by bhorstkotte
    If you had an uncompressed video source to play back, it might work just fine - its the decompression that kills it.
    Ok, I did some reading up on video - compression, decompression, codecs, container formats, etc. etc. but I still can't answer these questions:

    Is it possible to decompress a compressed video stream on the fly to output a decompressed video stream, or does it require either having the entire compressed file to decompress or having to create the entire decompressed file before streaming? If that can be done, what are the bandwidth requirements for streaming decompressed video? What decompressed video format would you pick? Indeo AVI? QuickTime? Something obviously supported by XBMC, but is there a 'preferred format'?

    Basically what I'm wondering, is it possible to create a proxy 'restreamer' on a powerful PC that mirrored a tivo, but streamed decompressed video instead so that XBMC didn't have to do the decompression?

  14. #29
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    Nov 2004
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    I certainly think it could be done -- after all, that's more or less what Tivoserver does. Now, could it be done fast enough? Not so sure about that, but maybe.

    The disk space, though, would be incredible. Can't use Indeo -- that's actually compressed, as are most QT files (not sure if the QT container supports uncompressed video). Would have to be just straight uncompressed AVI...and I shudder to think about how big a single 1-hr uncompressed video would be.

    Math: for a 1080i 46-min show (assuming you've edited commercials out), figure 1920 x 1080 x 24 bpp is 49766400 bits, or 6220800 bytes, or 6.1 megabytes. Figure roughly 30 of those per second (yeah, ok, so it's really 540 lines every 60 seconds, so shut up), so roughly 180 megabytes. Per second. So that's roughly 10.7 gigabytes/minute, or 491 gigabytes for your 46 minute show.
    --
    Christopher D. Heer
    Quote Originally Posted by Oscar Wilde
    Perhaps, after all, America never has been discovered. I myself would say that it had merely been detected.

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Narnia
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    1,263
    Quote Originally Posted by cheer
    Math: ... so roughly 180 megabytes. Per second.
    Good job cheer! That number is waaay over what most little home 100baseT networks could handle, in realtime.

    Even Gigabit, which I haven't really worked with, would likely be crushed, even with no other traffic on the LAN: Lessee... (1000Mbit/sec)(1 byte/8 bits) ..bit units cancel out... 125 Megabytes per second. Still not enough for a raw HiDef stream.

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