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Thread: PROM socketing

  1. #31
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    Jan 2004
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    Patches gone from tivocommunity. Anyone want to post them again or send them to me?

    [QUOTE=MuscleNerd]The patches I came up with are posted over on AVS in this post . But yeah like Kraven said, knowing them and applying them are very different

    Anyone care to repost the patches or send them to me? The thread at tivocommunity seems to have been deleted.

    Thanks

  2. #32
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    [QUOTE=sdguy]
    Quote Originally Posted by MuscleNerd
    The patches I came up with are posted over on AVS in this post . But yeah like Kraven said, knowing them and applying them are very different

    Anyone care to repost the patches or send them to me? The thread at tivocommunity seems to have been deleted.

    Thanks
    patches for the 1.18 prom (not the 2.5 prom used on RID units): http://www.dealdatabase.com/forum/sh...ad.php?t=27474
    Step one: search button!
    Silly Wabbit, guides are for kids

  3. #33
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    Jan 2004
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    Ive got SA S2 box which has 1.6 prom, is there patch for this one? Also any way to dump it? The getprom does not recognize -dump switch and /prom folder is empty.

  4. #34
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    I am not sure about this, but I think there might be an easy, cheap, and clean answer to prom socketing. Wolfson pointed me to something called chipquik, which claims to easily remove QFPs, PLCC's, and SOIC's.

    Now, I don't know exactly how this stuff is supposed to work, but I did some research and found that the chipquik includes an alloy whose key element is bismuth. Of all metals, bismuth is the one with the second lowest melting point (mercury of course being the lowest.)

    Bismuth melts at around ~140F afaik, and while I am just guessing here, I think the idea behind chipquik is that you melt the bismuth solder in with the regular lead solder (which melts at ~360F afaik) on all of the contact points, hence reducing their melting points. Once this is done, you can probably do like the website says and use hot air to easily pop the prom off of the motherboard....I think a hair dryer could even be used for this, because the melting point could easily go below 200F, depending on the material used to hold the prom to the motherboard. From there you can easily wick away the bismuth solder, then just add the socket to the board.

    Any soldering pros care to comment on this? My S2 "RID enabled" receiver should arrive soon, and theres a local store here called circuit specialists (somewhere near southern and country club for you phoenix residents) that carries this chipquik kit for $18...I might have a look at trying this.
    Last edited by AlphaWolf; 01-21-2004 at 03:04 AM.
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  5. #35
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    Jan 2002
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    AlphaWolf, Chipquik works well. With luck, the solder / chipquik mix will retain heat long enough that you can simply lift the prom from the board. Cleaning up the residue does require care - it is possible to lift the pads if you aren't careful.

    This still leaves the problem of soldering a replacement socket in place. Frankly, I've done a lot of soldering, including pulling surface mount ICs. When I looked at the HDVR2, I decided if I ever wanted to do it, I would send the board to Kraven and have him do it.

    PlainBill
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  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by PlainBill
    This still leaves the problem of soldering a replacement socket in place. Frankly, I've done a lot of soldering, including pulling surface mount ICs. When I looked at the HDVR2, I decided if I ever wanted to do it, I would send the board to Kraven and have him do it.
    When I did socketed the prom, I took a small exacto knife and cut the plastic grid out of the bottom of the socket so when you look at the bottom of the socket (or thriough the socket from the top) all you see are the pins. It makes it a lot easier to solder (with an iron) without the plastic grid.
    Last edited by Sleeper; 01-21-2004 at 12:39 PM.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sleeper
    When I did socketed the prom, I took a small exacto knife and cut the plastic grid out of the bottom of the socket so when you look at the bottom of the socket (or thriough the socket from the top) all you see are the pins. It makes it a lot easier to solder (with an iron) without the plastic grid.
    Yeah, but once you cut the grid you should probably not plan on removing and inserting multiple times since the grid is what holds it together. Socket will probably break pretty easily.

    Another option is to just solder in an in-circuit programmable chip like that AMD chip and skip the socket all together.
    Information wants to be free....

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRavEN
    Yeah, but once you cut the grid you should probably not plan on removing and inserting multiple times since the grid is what holds it together. Socket will probably break pretty easily.
    Initially, I thought it was going to weaken the socket, but the socket seems just as durable without the bottom. I performed many insertions/removals without a hitch.

  9. #39
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    I dunno about that. If you look at how a PLCC extraction tool works, it really just uses the two opposite corners. It pulls the chip against the socket. It doesn't try to pull the socket off the board. In actuality its pushing the socket into the board. If you really feel scared, you could add a little epoxy to hold down the socket. Not to mention the life cycle of the socket isn't meant for hundreds of insertion/extraction cycles. I remember the ISA bus slots are rated for 10 insert/extract cycles.


    Quote Originally Posted by KRavEN
    Yeah, but once you cut the grid you should probably not plan on removing and inserting multiple times since the grid is what holds it together. Socket will probably break pretty easily.

    Another option is to just solder in an in-circuit programmable chip like that AMD chip and skip the socket all together.
    Dave
    -----------------------------
    Life's a reach, then you gybe
    Hacks -SA 2 PROM, telnet, ftpd, tivoweb, tserver, mfs_ftp, & extraction
    SA2.5 PROM - telnet, ftpd, tserver (waiting for a tivoapp patch)

  10. #40
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    Dec 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by MudShark
    I was told, but haven't verrified, that the AMD chips aren't exactly the same. I guess read the data sheets and see.
    Just a heads up, Mouser electronics has the ssts in stock (be fast, only about 20 left)...You can buy them individually for about 2$ each...Have fun!

    jeboo

  11. #41
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    I'm not sure why I would buy them. If one has a programer, then they can copy the bin file and revert to the original program if needed. I just reprogramed mine and mashed it into the newly added socket.


    Quote Originally Posted by jeboo
    Just a heads up, Mouser electronics has the ssts in stock (be fast, only about 20 left)...You can buy them individually for about 2$ each...Have fun!

    jeboo
    Dave
    -----------------------------
    Life's a reach, then you gybe
    Hacks -SA 2 PROM, telnet, ftpd, tivoweb, tserver, mfs_ftp, & extraction
    SA2.5 PROM - telnet, ftpd, tserver (waiting for a tivoapp patch)

  12. #42
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    245

    Dvr40 Prom

    Quote Originally Posted by dubbya
    My good friend expat started a thread about the Trinity boards over at pvrhax0r:

    http://www.pvrhax0r.com/forum/showthread.php?threadid=4

    The patches for the 2.5 flash are included in his post.
    We have located four interesting patches to the new 2.5 PROM:

    24b0 = 10400014 -> 00000000 (enable debug msgs)
    2cdc = 14830004 -> 14840004 (disable prom sha-160)
    3a1c = 1043000c -> 1042000c (disable kernel check)
    35f8 = 0c771940 00000000 0440ff97 -> 0c7718d7 00000000 24020000 (skip memchk)
    Just had my PROM socketed by Kraven. Great work btw. Clean work,fast turnaround. Here is what I'm seeing on my serial output after killing the initrd.
    Code:
    PCI(13,0) DevVen=  351033 ClasRev=   c0310 USB
    PCI(13,1) DevVen=  351033 ClasRev=   c0310 USB
    PCI(13,2) DevVen=  e01033 ClasRev=   c0320 Unknown Device
    PCI(14,0) DevVen=    1741 ClasRev=  ff0000 TiVo ASIC
         reset -
    color_bars -
           msw - [ -32 | -16 | -8 ] <address> <value>
           msr - [ -32 | -16 | -8 ] <address>
          help -
         param - [ <new boot args> ]
       netboot - [ -skip ] [ -f <file> ] [ <boot string> ]
          boot - [ -skip ] [ -3 | -6 ] [ <boot string> ]
      ememtest -
      identify -
    Hit two returns to stop autoboot
    Attempting to disk load partition 6
    Kernel signed by 'Kernel release key'
    Hashing kernel... done
    Hash mismatch
    Hash mismatch
    Looks like the enabled messages worked ok. Not sure what the PROM SHA-160 check would look like, but no joy with the Hash mismatch. Anyone else have any sucess with editing 3a1c to 1042000c to kill the kernel check?

  13. #43
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    Jan 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by rpl
    Looks like the enabled messages worked ok. Not sure what the PROM SHA-160 check would look like, but no joy with the Hash mismatch. Anyone else have any sucess with editing 3a1c to 1042000c to kill the kernel check?
    The hash mismatch messages are normal. Try a known good kernel and make sure console output is enabled.

  14. #44
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    245

    Patches for the 2.5 PROM work

    You were correct ADH it was an operator error. With a unmodified kernel I had
    Code:
    Hit two returns to stop autoboot
    Attempting to disk load partition 6
    Kernel signed by 'Kernel release key'
    Hashing kernel... done
    Checking signature... done.
    Signed, valid for release
    and with a properly killed initrd
    Code:
    Hit two returns to stop autoboot
    Attempting to disk load partition 6
    Kernel signed by 'Kernel release key'
    Hashing kernel... done
    Hash mismatch
    Hash mismatch
    Loading R5432 MMU routines.
    ..
    booted just fine
    I was trying to use the killinitrd-s2-v3.x that I had with the monte files.

  15. #45
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1

    newark part number for plcc

    This chip works in my DSR7000:

    NEWARK INONE PART #: 08C4182 ; ICs Flash Memory, CMOS, Parallel Interface, 1MB, 70 nS, 3 V Supply Voltage, 32-PLCC
    QUANTITY: 2 @ $2.68 = $5.36

    I think it's the AMD, but don't remember! I used the Chipquick method for removal and it worked like a charm. I also cut away the center web of the PLCC socket. Even with a very fine tip iron it was too hard to get to all the pins.

    BTW - I was trying to netboot a kernel, it would read the file off my tftp/bootp server just fine, but since the kernel was DD'd off the disk the size is too large and the netboot pukes. Does someone have a utility to determine the exact # of blocks to make the kernel image so netboot works?

    cheers - Yonk

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