Page 4 of 26 FirstFirst ... 2345614 ... LastLast
Results 46 to 60 of 390

Thread: PROM socketing

  1. #46
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,285
    Quote Originally Posted by yonk
    I also cut away the center web of the PLCC socket. Even with a very fine tip iron it was too hard to get to all the pins.
    That is definately the trick!

    BTW - I was trying to netboot a kernel, it would read the file off my tftp/bootp server just fine, but since the kernel was DD'd off the disk the size is too large and the netboot pukes. Does someone have a utility to determine the exact # of blocks to make the kernel image so netboot works?
    Please let me know if you are successful with the netboot. I have not attempted it but it is something that I always wanted to try - just haven't gotten to it.

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    537
    Quote Originally Posted by yonk
    This chip works in my DSR7000:

    NEWARK INONE PART #: 08C4182 ; ICs Flash Memory, CMOS, Parallel Interface, 1MB, 70 nS, 3 V Supply Voltage, 32-PLCC
    QUANTITY: 2 @ $2.68 = $5.36

    I think it's the AMD, but don't remember! I used the Chipquick method for removal and it worked like a charm. I also cut away the center web of the PLCC socket. Even with a very fine tip iron it was too hard to get to all the pins.

    BTW - I was trying to netboot a kernel, it would read the file off my tftp/bootp server just fine, but since the kernel was DD'd off the disk the size is too large and the netboot pukes. Does someone have a utility to determine the exact # of blocks to make the kernel image so netboot works?

    cheers - Yonk

    These are in-circuit flashable from what Im reading on the data sheet nice find.
    Ma l'italiano Ť benissimo

    Ex-Cantidate John Kerry
    Its not what you want it's what the electorate wants.

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Sonoran Desert
    Posts
    2,829
    Quote Originally Posted by yonk
    NEWARK INONE PART #: 08C4182 ; ICs Flash Memory, CMOS, Parallel Interface, 1MB, 70 nS, 3 V Supply Voltage, 32-PLCC
    QUANTITY: 2 @ $2.68 = $5.36

    I think it's the AMD, but don't remember! I used the Chipquick method for removal and it worked like a charm. I also cut away the center web of the PLCC socket. Even with a very fine tip iron it was too hard to get to all the pins.
    /me doesn't know how he missed this earlier.

    Very interesting. I have been too much of a coward to try this (also lacking free time,) would you mind describing the process you went through with this whole thing? The main thing that scares me, is somebody said that its possible to lift the pads with the chipquik, but since it doesn't get very hot, I am not certain of what the odds of this happening are.

    If it sounds easy enough, I might get around to doing this during spring break, and maybe publish a howto (w/pictures) for it. FWIW, the hardest soldering jobs I have ever done were for modding a PS2 (27 solder points) and an xbox (13 solder points) but neither of which involved removing any surface mount chips. (PLCC look easier than your average surface mount though)
    Last edited by AlphaWolf; 03-07-2004 at 12:50 PM.
    Before PMing me: Iím not your personal tech support. If you have a question, ask in public so I don't have to repeat if somebody else asks. If you want images or slices, use emule. I will ignore all support PMs.

    Sponsor a vegetarian! I have taken the pledge, how about you?

  4. #49
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    78

    32

    Quote Originally Posted by AlphaWolf
    /me doesn't know how he missed this earlier.

    Very interesting. I have been too much of a coward to try this (also lacking free time,) would you mind describing the process you went through with this whole thing? The main thing that scares me, is somebody said that its possible to lift the pads with the chipquik, but since it doesn't get very hot, I am not certain of what the odds of this happening are.

    If it sounds easy enough, I might get around to doing this during spring break, and maybe publish a howto (w/pictures) for it. FWIW, the hardest soldering jobs I have ever done were for modding a PS2 (27 solder points) and an xbox (13 solder points) but neither of which involved removing any surface mount chips. (PLCC look easier than your average surface mount though)
    I posted previously that Mouser electronics has plenty of SSTs in stock...Still do btw. This was my first SMT experience as well, and heres a quick breakdown, including costs (If you are only going to do 1-2 units, this will not be worth it! Send it to Kraven).

    Supplies:
    1) I used the butane soldering iron from RatShack (15$). Sad, I know.

    2) Chips and sockets ordered from Mouser/Digikey (2$ for a chip and socket).

    3) Willem EEPROM programmer from ebay (including shipping and the plcc32 adapter, 50-70$). I bought this cause I was concerned the lack of real SMT equipment may fry the original chip during removal...And I didnt really care to try the hot-swap deadhomiez mentioned. This programmer really is worth the $, especially if you mess with other h/w Also, the SST39vf chips will program/erase fine at 5V (dont need the plcc32 adapter that has a 3.3V jumper).


    Once you have everything, I would practice removing SMT chips and installing sockets on any old PC cards you have...Once you find the butane settings and method that works, its easy...My extraction went smoothly, but I've heard from others if a pad is lifted, you're in for some work. The socket was soldered in with a regular iron after punching out the bottom piece. Flash with programmer or deadhomiez prog.

    It really is a nice improvement...It increases boot time a bit, which is nice for dev'ing and testing

    jeboo

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Sonoran Desert
    Posts
    2,829
    Quote Originally Posted by jeboo
    I posted previously that Mouser electronics has plenty of SSTs in stock...Still do btw. This was my first SMT experience as well, and heres a quick breakdown, including costs (If you are only going to do 1-2 units, this will not be worth it! Send it to Kraven).

    Supplies:
    1) I used the butane soldering iron from RatShack (15$). Sad, I know.

    2) Chips and sockets ordered from Mouser/Digikey (2$ for a chip and socket).

    3) Willem EEPROM programmer from ebay (including shipping and the plcc32 adapter, 50-70$). I bought this cause I was concerned the lack of real SMT equipment may fry the original chip during removal...And I didnt really care to try the hot-swap deadhomiez mentioned. This programmer really is worth the $, especially if you mess with other h/w Also, the SST39vf chips will program/erase fine at 5V (dont need the plcc32 adapter that has a 3.3V jumper).


    Once you have everything, I would practice removing SMT chips and installing sockets on any old PC cards you have...Once you find the butane settings and method that works, its easy...My extraction went smoothly, but I've heard from others if a pad is lifted, you're in for some work. The socket was soldered in with a regular iron after punching out the bottom piece. Flash with programmer or deadhomiez prog.

    It really is a nice improvement...It increases boot time a bit, which is nice for dev'ing and testing

    jeboo
    I am more interested in doing it myself than I am with saving money though.

    The butane soldering iron you got, does that use hot air? or is it just a normal tip, only heated with butane gas?

    BTW, I still want to try the chipquik method just for novelty sake though (it just sounds interesting)

    Also, why did you buy a programmer if you installed the socket? Isn't it much easier just to have the tivo itself program it anyways?
    Before PMing me: Iím not your personal tech support. If you have a question, ask in public so I don't have to repeat if somebody else asks. If you want images or slices, use emule. I will ignore all support PMs.

    Sponsor a vegetarian! I have taken the pledge, how about you?

  6. #51
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    78
    Quote Originally Posted by AlphaWolf
    I am more interested in doing it myself than I am with saving money though.

    The butane soldering iron you got, does that use hot air? or is it just a normal tip, only heated with butane gas?

    BTW, I still want to try the chipquik method just for novelty sake though (it just sounds interesting)

    Also, why did you buy a programmer if you installed the socket? Isn't it much easier just to have the tivo itself program it anyways?
    The soldering iron comes with two tips, one for "hot air" and one for normal soldering. The chipquik method sounds neat indeed, but with the hot air tip, you will have everything you need.

    Call it paranoia, but I was worried the original PROM wouldnt survive the extraction. If that happens, you cannot boot to flash the new chip...So the programmer was basically an anti-brick purchase.

    Nothing like doing it yourself

  7. #52
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    89
    I did it with a SMD rework station. Only thing with reusing the chip, if adding a socket, is cleaning off all the solder from the 'pins' I had a tivo go belly up after a few months. Really didn't do much more then pull the chip out of the socket adn inspect the pins. looked good, put it back in and it is working again.

    Quote Originally Posted by jeboo
    The soldering iron comes with two tips, one for "hot air" and one for normal soldering. The chipquik method sounds neat indeed, but with the hot air tip, you will have everything you need.

    Call it paranoia, but I was worried the original PROM wouldnt survive the extraction. If that happens, you cannot boot to flash the new chip...So the programmer was basically an anti-brick purchase.

    Nothing like doing it yourself
    Dave
    -----------------------------
    Life's a reach, then you gybe
    Hacks -SA 2 PROM, telnet, ftpd, tivoweb, tserver, mfs_ftp, & extraction
    SA2.5 PROM - telnet, ftpd, tserver (waiting for a tivoapp patch)

  8. #53
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    25

    need prom image 2.5

    Help, i think that i burn the original sst37 while i was desoldering it using solder wick (need more practice), my tivo is a SD-DVR40, does any one have a virgin image of the prom, i think is firmware v2.5, am i rigth?

    thanks for your help
    Last edited by roberton; 03-11-2004 at 02:59 PM.

  9. #54
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,285

    Prom Removal

    I take a piece of aluminum foil and cut a square hole in it to make a heat shield. Then blast the prom with a heat gun while applying some prying pressure with a pick. Sucker pops right off every time without damaging pads.

    Cut the bottom out of the prom socket and solder in place with a fine tip iron. A magnifier helps.

  10. #55
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Dallas
    Posts
    588
    BTW, I'm not doing the sockets anymore. I just don't have enough time with my ever increasing job responsibilities.
    Information wants to be free....

  11. #56
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Sonoran Desert
    Posts
    2,829
    Quote Originally Posted by Sleeper
    I take a piece of aluminum foil and cut a square hole in it to make a heat shield. Then blast the prom with a heat gun while applying some prying pressure with a pick. Sucker pops right off every time without damaging pads.

    Cut the bottom out of the prom socket and solder in place with a fine tip iron. A magnifier helps.
    Sounds nice, can you be a bit more descriptive though?
    Before PMing me: Iím not your personal tech support. If you have a question, ask in public so I don't have to repeat if somebody else asks. If you want images or slices, use emule. I will ignore all support PMs.

    Sponsor a vegetarian! I have taken the pledge, how about you?

  12. #57
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,285
    Quote Originally Posted by AlphaWolf
    Sounds nice, can you be a bit more descriptive though?
    Not really, but here is a picture of the heat shield.

  13. #58
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    78
    Quote Originally Posted by AlphaWolf
    Sounds nice, can you be a bit more descriptive though?
    I did the same thing as Sleeper...Literally cut a hole in a piece of alum. foil just large enough for the chip...Take either a pick or the smallest flathead screwdriver you have (kinda like the eyeglass kit ones) and insert under one of the corners...I chose to heat three sides of the chip and pry it up, leaving one row still attached...Then the last row is painless. BE conservative, its better to have to stop and start over than to lift pads.

    Have fun

  14. #59
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,285
    Quote Originally Posted by jeboo
    I chose to heat three sides of the chip and pry it up, leaving one row still attached...Then the last row is painless. BE conservative, its better to have to stop and start over than to lift pads.
    I heat the whole chip EVENLY. You will feel/see it start to give. I don't necessairly agree with the stop and start over. Tourch the puppy until it pops right off. You will not damage the pads unless you really pry the chip real hard. Gentle pressure is all you need.

  15. #60
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Sonoran Desert
    Posts
    2,829
    What kind of "heat gun" do you use? And how exactly did you apply the heat to the pins?
    Before PMing me: Iím not your personal tech support. If you have a question, ask in public so I don't have to repeat if somebody else asks. If you want images or slices, use emule. I will ignore all support PMs.

    Sponsor a vegetarian! I have taken the pledge, how about you?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •