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Thread: restore in windows xp?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    Cool restore in windows xp?

    I have partitioned my C drive, it now also G and formatted it fat32. I moved my .bak files into G but I'm not getting something right because when I try to restore it tells me no such file or directory. I'm mounting hda1 /mnt/c, not sure what else to try. I'm doing this from some specific directions and the only thing I've done different is the placement of my tivo drive, it is set up as primary and cs(slave)...Help...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by loserbaby2
    I have partitioned my C drive, it now also G and formatted it fat32. I moved my .bak files into G but I'm not getting something right because when I try to restore it tells me no such file or directory. I'm mounting hda1 /mnt/c, not sure what else to try. I'm doing this from some specific directions and the only thing I've done different is the placement of my tivo drive, it is set up as primary and cs(slave)...Help...
    You need to change the 1 in hda1 to whatever partition number the G is.
    SpongeBob is not a contraceptive - Bart S.
    A tabloid, is that one of those really strong mints? - Homer S.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    Cool cool...

    Quote Originally Posted by BubbleLamp
    You need to change the 1 in hda1 to whatever partition number the G is.

    So would that be like "2" the 2nd partition on that drive....?


    BTW, Thanks

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    30

    check HD status

    use Fdisk and check the Hard Drive status (function 4 or 5 I think) that will give you the number of your G drive.

    Quote Originally Posted by loserbaby2
    So would that be like "2" the 2nd partition on that drive....?


    BTW, Thanks
    I had a handle on life, then it broke

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    20

    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by Spaceman_Spiff
    use Fdisk and check the Hard Drive status (function 4 or 5 I think) that will give you the number of your G drive.
    hda2 worked for me.

    Thanks

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    149
    hd A = primary master
    hd B = primary slave
    hd C = secondary master
    hd D = secondary slave

    the number after that is for partition number. If you have 12 partitions and you want to access the 12th it would be hda12

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
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    522
    Quote Originally Posted by loserbaby2
    I have partitioned my C drive, it now also G and formatted it fat32.
    Hey, all. Instead of having people do that, let's build a new mfstools boot disk with an NTFS-enabled kernel.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheWickedPriest
    Hey, all. Instead of having people do that, let's build a new mfstools boot disk with an NTFS-enabled kernel.
    Would be a better idea if write enabled NTFS drivers were stable in linux. Read is fine but everyone highly recommends against writing.
    Malfunct

    HDVR2 - 120hours - Extraction enabled
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by malfunct
    Would be a better idea if write enabled NTFS drivers were stable in linux. Read is fine but everyone highly recommends against writing.
    Yea, even if you totally forget mfs tools, its a problem getting ntfs working in redhat or any linux distro. The problem is writing to the partition. Things can be come unstable and currupt it. This could cause a potential loss of all data on that partition.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
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    I'd heard recently that NTFS writing had become stable in Linux 2.6. But I'll look into it some more...

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
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    362
    Why bother. For our purposes loading up a ntfs volume is really overkill. Those usb pen drives are dropping in price at an alarming rate. My images are normally only about 100 to 200 megabytes. A usb pen drive can take care of that with no problem.

    They would even make a good storage medium. No need to burn cd's only to find out that when you need them they have deteriorated to the point of no return.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheWickedPriest
    I'd heard recently that NTFS writing had become stable in Linux 2.6. But I'll look into it some more...

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