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Thread: TurboNet Call in Message "Service Unavailable"

  1. #1
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    TurboNet Call in Message "Service Unavailable"

    Hello:

    SVR 2000, Series 1.

    I have used a TurboNet Card for some time.

    Up till now, not too many problems.

    But recently I switched from Cable TV to Satellite and I had to go through setup to do it.

    As luck would have it, when I did the setup my network wasn't working. So I just used the analog telephone connection. I deleted the ",#401" prefix and used plain old dial in.

    The setup went real fine. When finished I disconnected the phone line.

    Several days later, I fixed my network. Changed from cable Internet to DSL at this point. The network was back up. So, I put the ",#401" prefix back into the Tivo and tried a test call.

    Now, every time I try to call in I get a "Service Unavailable" Message.

    It seems like it "dials" real fast and then gives me the quoted error message.

    Does anyone know how to fix this?

    By the way, I looked at several posts on this forum concerning this topic. Most of the fixes require some sort of telnet analysis. I noticed that not only does myTurboNet card not dial in. I can also not now telnet. The onset of the telnet problem coincides with the other items I discussed above. So, I guess the fact that the TurboNet card can't communicate right now is precluding Telnet, at least for the moment. And, I imagine that is going to preclude a "Telnet" fix at this time.

    Thanks.

    Michael

    PS. I should mention one more thing about the change I made to my network. Don't know whether this is important but here goes.

    When I switched the network from cable Internet to DSL I had to make one change to the Linksys router. I had to go change the DHCP starting range from 192.168.1.100 to 192.168.2.100. That was something that Linksys said you should do. So I did it.

    I should also mention that via previous hacks the Tivo has always been set to a static IP address which is 192.168.1.200. I don't know if the inconsistency in the subnet between the Tivo and the Linksys router should make a difference or not. I wouldn't think so. But then, what do I know?

    Just thought I'd mention it in case it makes a difference.

    Thanks again.

    Michael

  2. #2
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    Did you happen to have your hacks and turbonet drivers stored in /var? If so, the tivo may have decided to do away with /var and all your hacks at some point.

  3. #3
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    I thought of that, but on reflection I doubt that this is the problem.

    For one thing, some of the hacks must still be around even after the update. For example, I hacked the drive and was able to get about 89 hours of recording time out of a 20 hour tivo by getting a bigger hard drive.

    The 89 hours is still there. So I'm assuming that at least that hack remains in place. Heck, maybe all of the hacks are still in place for all I know.

    Second, when you put a new TurboNet card in you don't need to install any software. Apparently, the native Tivo software automatically detects and configures the TurboNet card. So that process is not even dependent on hacks (or after-market software) at all. Sure, the Telnet feature and some of the other elaborate stuff requires hacks, but the TurboNet card and its ability to make the daily call is native to Tivo software.

    To conclude, the update might indeed have fried some of the exotic hacks, but the daily call via TurboNet is not a hack.

    Not trying to sound like an expert here. Just drawing conclusions based on what little I know about all of this.

    Thanks for writing. And any other ideas you have would be more than welcome.

    Michael

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by goofeyfoot View Post
    SVR 2000, Series 1.
    I have used a TurboNet Card for some time.

    I should also mention that via previous hacks the Tivo has always been set to a static IP address which is 192.168.1.200.
    When you re-did your Guided Setup to include the satellite set-top box, it sure sounds like it wiped out your /var paritition. The extra MFS partitions you set up to get your "89-hours" shouldn't change no matter what software revision is running on the Tivo.

    My understanding of the Tivo built-in S1 TurboNet support is pretty low, but I'm certainly inclined to believe the subnet change is a partial culprit. The Series-1 doesn't really have any "network testing" function like the v7 and v8 software. It might help if you could validate the Tivo's IP address, by checking the DHCP logs on the linksys router or something. Its possible the Tivo is still "stuck" on the old IP address.

    You might want to temporarily unplug the electronic IR blaster "eye" and hook up a serial-port cable between the Tivo and your computer to see if you can get serial console access.
    Last edited by Narf54321; 08-29-2007 at 03:07 PM.

  5. #5
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    When you re-did your Guided Setup to include the satellite set-top box, it sure sounds like it wiped out your /var paritition. The extra MFS partitions you set up to get your "89-hours" shouldn't change no matter what software revision is running on the Tivo.

    OK, I did not know that. Does that mean I have to re-do all of the hacking that I followed from Hinsdale?[/U][/U]

    My understanding of the Tivo built-in S1 TurboNet support is pretty low, but I'm certainly inclined to believe the subnet change is a partial culprit. The Series-1 doesn't really have any "network testing" function like the v7 and v8 software. It might help if you could validate the Tivo's IP address, by checking the DHCP logs on the linksys router or something. Its possible the Tivo is still "stuck" on the old IP address.

    On looking at the DHCP logs on linksys, I don't see the Tivo at all. I assumed, perhaps incorrectly that this was because the IP didn't originate with Linksys. The Tivo has a fixed IP address. Am I wrong about this? Should the Tivo show on the router somewhere?

    You might want to temporarily unplug the electronic IR blaster "eye" and hook up a serial-port cable between the Tivo and your computer to see if you can get serial console access.

    When you say unplug the blaster, I take it that is the little IR dongle that changes the channel on the satellite box. Where do I get a cable that will work between that IR port and the Tivo? Is it some sort of special cable? Is it a stereo cable? Where would I obtain such a cable? Also, what types of commands would you use for serial access? Would it be the regular Telnet type of thing?

    Sorry to ask so many questions, but I wanted to get it right before I start the project.

    Thanks much for responding.

    Michael

    Today 06:45 AM

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by goofeyfoot View Post
    OK, I did not know that. Does that mean I have to re-do all of the hacking that I followed from Hinsdale?
    No, Hindsale guide is only used for expanding a new drive to full recording capacity. Your current drive should be fine.

    It's also possible any "hacks" you've done (such as telnet access) might still be on the box, but without the ability to login you won't know.


    Quote Originally Posted by goofeyfoot View Post
    On looking at the DHCP logs on linksys, I don't see the Tivo at all. I assumed, perhaps incorrectly that this was because the IP didn't originate with Linksys. The Tivo has a fixed IP address. Am I wrong about this? Should the Tivo show on the router somewhere?
    Sounds like the Tivo is not doing DHCP with your local Linksys router. The TiVo is probably still stuck with the 'old' IP address, on that 'old' subnet.
    You could try to set the router back to the original 192.168.1.X network and see if you regain your Tivo access. That would at least tell you if your Tivo networking is completely disabled or merely "stuck" with old settings.

    Quote Originally Posted by goofeyfoot View Post
    When you say unplug the blaster, I take it that is the little IR dongle that changes the channel on the satellite box. Where do I get a cable that will work between that IR port and the Tivo? Is it some sort of special cable?
    It's a rather uncommon cable. If you don't wish to build your own cable, you can go to a site like 9th Tee and order a compatible one. Look for the product "TiVo Null Modem Serial Cable". It has a DB9 (9-pin) connection for a PC type serial port. I also have such a cable which came with my old circa 1999 Kodak DC215 digital camera. The camera is long gone, but I still use the cable with my Tivos today.

    When you see posts saying something like "capture the console output for troubleshooting," this type of cable from the Tivo to the computer is what they are talking about.

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the post.

    Your point about setting the Linksys back to the original subnet is pretty intriguing.

    Seems like it might provide the easiest fix. If I get the Linksys up and running on the "1" subnet, I could possibly change the Tivo back to a temporary IP. With that accomplished, I could possibly go back to the "2" subnet and let the Linksys assign an IP to the Tivo.

    Seems like this might be the easiest (my favorite kind) resolution, at least if it works.

    Will let you know how it goes.

    Thanks again for the insights. I'd be lost without them.

    Michael

  8. #8
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    Hello Narf:

    So I tried the reset of the Liinksys subnet back to "1". At that point I was actually able to Telnet into the Tivo - a good sign.

    I think, though, that my hacks may have been fried. For example I tried the "ls" command and it wasn't recognized. Makes me think all the hacks are toast.

    I couldn't remember how to scroll around in the "Var" directory to actually see what's in the hacks. I'd like to look around and see what, if anything is left.

    Assuming I have to do a re-hack do you have any suggestions as to the best written technique to follow?

    Thanks again.

    Michael

  9. #9
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    Unfortunately, 'ls' is not included with the regular Tivo system software.

    You may neede to take the Tivo apart and pull the harddrive. This depends on if your tivoftpd and/or tivobin.tgz files have been deleted from /var. For S1 units, I believe the Steven Jenkin's guide is still pretty helpful. You should start around Step 4 "Installing Binaries on your TiVo that are Useful for Further Hacking". If the indicated .tgz files are missing, you're probably going to need to pull the drive.

    The 'ls' tool and other missing command-line tools are included in that tivobin.tgz archive file.
    Last edited by Narf54321; 08-31-2007 at 12:01 PM.

  10. #10
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    Narf:

    Yeah, that "ls" thing is what made me suspect that some hacks got cooked.

    But the bright side is that I've done the Jenkins hacks a couple times now and can pretty much do them blindfolded.

    One more point. I have a computer that is mostly SATA interfaces. There is one IDE controller with the usual master/ slave configuration.

    I don't have a fat32 partition on a SATA drive on which to make a backup. Is there some way to create a fat 32 partition on one of the SATA drive without wrecking the stuff that's already on it? I don't have any exotic software for this purpose. Am using WINXP.

    If I could somehow "slide" the exising partitions on the SATA drive and create the FAT32 partition I could do a much-needed backup while I am fixing this thing.

    Thanks again for taking an interest in this problem.

    Michael

  11. #11
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    You shouldn't need to go as far as making a backup at this point, unless you're afraid of really really screwing up. All you should need at this point is to put the drive in the PC, boot a Tivo-friendly (and S1 friendly) linux CD, and copy tivobin.tgz to the Tivo's /var partition (should be 9 ). You probably also want to put tivoftpd on there as well, for good measure so you'll be able to FTP anything else up to the Tivo remotely..

    If you machine is more modern than the Jenkin's CD can handle (i.e. SATA support and all that), try the MFSLive CD with SATA and USB support. Good for those USB thumbdrives, and hooking your Tivo drive to an external USB enclosure thingie. Make sure you boot into "byteswap" mode for your Series-1 unit. You'll still need to find a way to get tivobin.tgz onto the Tivo drive.

    Personally, I don't even use a harddrive for Tivo backups anymore. You can get those 2GB and 4GB USB thumbdrive thingies relatively cheap these days, and they're almost always FAT32 formatted. When done, boot back into Windoze and burn the image from the thumbdrive to a CD-R.

    I wouldn't bother trying to resize your Windoze partition. Just get a largish capacity USB thumbdrive key thingie and make sure you copy tivobin.tgz onto it before you start.
    Last edited by Narf54321; 08-31-2007 at 02:42 PM.

  12. #12
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    Narf:

    What a great solution with the thumb drives. Heck I was all set to buy a new drive, format it and the whole bit.

    I will give that a shot and hopefully have a full report for you next time.

    Thanks a lot. You have saved me a whole bunch of time and resources with your ideas.

    Best regards.

    Michael

  13. #13
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    Narf:

    Pulled the drives and reinstalled the binaries and everything seems to work fine. Changed the subnet over to "2" which is what the router is on and the daily calls go in fine.

    Two residual questions.

    Now that I have this thing up and running I really want to back it up so I hopefully never have to do it again. I tried using the thumb drive thing. When Linux boots up, I don't see where the thumb drive thing shows up. I was lookiing for something to the effect of "hda" "hdb" etc. Does a thumb drive show up diferrently? I did see something called usb.c but with the decimal point in there I don't think that's it. Anyway, just wondering why the thumb drive didn't show up.

    The other point was that the Tivo doesn't show up under gotomydvr.com. It used to. Did some binary get fried there too?

    Thanks again for your helpful suggestions. Saved me a pile of time.

    Michael

  14. #14
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    A USB thumbdrive and SATA drives will often show up in linux as /dev/sda. Because there are often a number of USB ports on a computer, you never know exactly what device number it will show up under.

    You also need a linux boot CD which can handle USB devices (and which understands Tivo hard drives), preferably with the hotplug driver. That's why I mentioned the MFSLive CD, because it works pretty well with newer PCs, SATA drives, and USB devices. The easiest way to figure out the device entry is to wait until the linux CD boots, and then attach the thumbdrive and carefully watch the display for automated mount point.

    You can also try the mount command, by itself, which should show you all mounted partitions the system including the device location.
    Or try the Disk Free command df, or try listing out the /proc directory for clues but this can be more confusing.
    Last edited by Narf54321; 09-04-2007 at 10:19 AM.

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